Courses


Graduate Course Descriptions
Spring 2016
| Fall 2015 | Spring 2015

Fall 2017

26:510:533 Topics in American History: “United States and Empire”
Kornel Chang
Wednesdays 5:00-7:40pm

This reading-intensive seminar focuses on U.S. empire-building, examining how it evolved from a white settler society to a global hegemon in the twentieth century. Drawing on both canonical and more recent scholarship, the course pays close attention to the ideals, rationales, and policies that animated and justified American imperialism over the course of two centuries. Students will track the evolution of American power, comprehending its shifting logic and contradictions, and examining how it has changed over time and space. This will involve studying the American Empire from the vantage point of class and political economy, race and gender, policing, public health, development, and the environment.

26:510:551 American Intellectual and Cultural History: “Introduction to American Studies”
Ruth Feldstein
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

This graduate seminar will introduce students to scholarship in American Studies, as we explore together where the field has been and where it is going. We will be reading influential older articles and books; theoretical work that has had a particularly significant impact on American Studies; and newer studies which suggest the issues with which scholars of American Studies are currently engaged.

26:510:553 American Political and Legal History: “Radical Politics in U.S. History” (RESEARCH SEMINAR)
Whitney Strub
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm

This course is a research seminar that will begin with readings offering a basic overview of U.S. radical politics, with an emphasis on Left radicalism. Among possible topics will be early populism, free love, the labor movement, communists, socialists, Black Power, the antiwar movement and 1960s student left, feminism, gay liberation, revolutionary groups of the 1970s, anti-nuclear activism, AIDS activism, anti-globalization efforts, environmentalism, and such recent movements as Occupy Wall Street and #BlackLivesMatter. We will spend the first half of the semester in focused readings, and then in the second half students will pursue individual research projects related to their particular interests from this history.

26:510:565 Public History: “Place, Community and Public Humanities”
Mary Rizzo
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm

In this public humanities/history graduate seminar, students will work with a community partner on a project about local history for the public. The class will ground students in the history, theory, and methods of place-based public history and community engagement. Students will also engage in original research, using archival collections, digitized materials, and/or oral history, over the semester to develop the class' public project.

To register for the following course, simply fill out the NJIT Cross Registration Application (www.newark.rutgers.edu/sites/default/files/njit_form.pdf) and return it to cstras@rutgers.edu.

48:510:632 Technology, Culture, and History
Elizabeth Petrick
307 Cullimore Hall, NJIT Campus
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00pm

This course concerns the relationship between technology and culture, and how it has been studied over time. We will examine how each has shaped the other in various historical contexts. We will analyze methods of researching and understanding technology and culture through key texts in the historiography, as well as new approaches. Themes include: the use of technology; gender, race, and technology; technological determinism; labor and technology; imperialism and technology.

Key texts include:

Leo Marx, The Machine in the Garden: Technology and the Pastoral Ideal in America. (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1964.
Francesca Bray, Technology and Gender: Fabrics of Power in Late Imperial China. (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press), 1997.
Gregory J. Downey, Telegraph Messenger Boys: Labor, Technology, and Geography, 1850-1950. (New York: Routledge), 2002.
Eden Medina, Cybernetic Revolutionaries: Technology and Politics in Allende’s Chile. (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press), 2014.

Spring 2017

26:510:505 History in Fiction and Fact
James Goodman
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing. Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism. Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor. We shall also read a wide range of non-fiction, but not an enormous number of pages per week.  I do not want your reading to interfere with the writing you are doing for this workshop or for the poetry or fiction workshop you may be taking at the same time. Permission of the instructor is required for registration (goodmanj@andromeda.rutgers.edu).

26:510:526 Readings in African American History
Melissa Cooper
Mondays 5:30-8:10pm

This course explores foundational and groundbreaking historical monographs in African American history. Paying close attention to methodological approaches and strategies, this course examines both African American history and the making of historical monographs about the black past.

26:510:533 Introduction to Digital Public Humanities
Mary Rizzo

Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

What happens when we make digital humanities public? What about when we take the public humanities and make them digital? This course will explore the history, theory and methods of the digital humanities and the public humanities and, especially, their intersection. We will use and critically examine digital tools like Omeka, mapping software, content management systems, and social media to put theory into practice. By the end of the semester, students will have conceptualized a digital public humanities project, written a grant application for potential funding, and built a prototype.

26:510:534 Sexuality and Sexual Politics (Research Seminar)
Timothy Stewart-Winter
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

This graduate research seminar will examine classic and more recent texts dealing with sexuality and power, primarily in the U.S. but with attention to transnational phenomena and experiences. Readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines and will attend closely to the intersections of sexuality with gender and gender identity, science, race, class, social movements, literature, and urban and suburban cultures and politics. Students will also gain experience analyzing primary documents related to histories of sexuality and gender.

26:510:543 Topics in World History: Global Africa
Habtamu Tegegne
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

This graduate seminar encourages students to (re)conceptualize and (re)think world history as global. It is a course organized around themes, topics, and processes that transcend national and cultural specificity and boundary and lend themselves to global history method. As such, going beyond a focus on discrete nations/regions, its main concerns is with human interconnections from the 1300 through the present, focusing on vast networks and system(s) that bound different regions and distant peoples together. The course’s geographic focus is Africa. It requires students to engage world/global history in its interaction with Africa. The continent lies within the locus of global historical processes: Africa has always been closely linked to the wider world and participated, sometime directly, other time indirectly, in broader historical developments and changes affecting the global world. The transformative political, economic, and social institutions, ideas, and processes underlying global history were shaped through Africa’s various encounter with the rest of the world. The literature that will be explored places African historical developments in global and transnational context and traces the broader implications of Africa’s history on global history. Topics that the course will cover include travel, migration and cross-cultural encounters, slavery and the slave trade, global capitalism and trade flows, empire, expansion and transnationalism, economic dependency, and globalization, among others.

26:510:564 History of Urban Education
Steven Diner
Tuesdays, 2:30-5:20pm

This course examines the history of urban education in the United States. It provides an historical foundation for understanding urban educational policy today. Assigned readings explore the development of urban school systems in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the rise of school reform movements and the development of urban educational policies designed to improve urban schools; the recruitment and training of urban school teachers; the role of race, immigration, ethnicity and class in educational performance; the rise of bureaucracy and scientific management; suburbanization and its effects on urban schools; desegregation and its impact; the effect of deindustrialization on urban schools; and the debate over  equity versus excellence. The course is taught as a colloquium. Each week we will discuss an assigned book. Class attendance and active participation in discussions is required of all students. Students must prepare a research paper based on some aspect of history of public education in Newark or some other local community, and present the findings in class during the last two weeks.

To register for the following course, simply fill out the NJIT Cross Registration Application (http://registrar.newark.rutgers.edu/files/njit-crossregform-2012a.pdf) and return it to history@newark.rutgers.edu.

48:510:622 Culture and Science in the History of American Medicine
Stephen Pemberton
307 Cullimore Hall, NJIT Campus

Thursdays 5:30-8:10 pm

This seminar provides an overview of U.S. medical history from the 1880 to 2010, and introduces the student to various approaches that historians and other historical thinkers have used to understand the complex relationships between medicine, science and culture. Of particular focus will be the extent to which medicine is or has been scientific; the ways science became vital to the medical and health professions; and the degrees to which medicine’s professional culture both mirrors and informs American society and popular culture. Our readings will allow us to link interactions between medicine, science and culture to the changing moral and political economies of health in the U.S. and analyze a variety of issues, including the growing role of technology in medicine, the roles of business and government in managing health, and the historical effects of specific disease problems, including polio and cancer. Students will also have the opportunity to explore how issues of class, race, gender and sexuality have impacted cultural interactions between medical professionals, scientists, patients, and the public.

Readings will include ten books, including:
Anne Fadiman. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down
Siddhartha Mukherjee. The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer
Leslie Reagan. Dangerous Pregnancies: Mothers, Disabilities, and Abortion in Modern America
David Oshinsky. Polio: An American Story
Nancy Tomes. The Gospel of Germs: Men, Women, and the Microbe in American Life
Rebecca Skloot. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
Keith Wailoo. Pain: A Political History

Fall 2016

26:510:533 Topics in American History: Race and Labor in the Americas (Research Seminar)
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

Kornel Chang

The spread of capitalist relations introduced a spectrum of "free" and "unfree labor" in the Americas beginning with the seventeenth century. The different labor systems--slavery, indentured, wage labor, guest worker programs--produced, and were produced by, racial knowledge and systems of meaning. This research seminar will focus on how race and class were co-constituted in the Americas and how they evolved with changing modes of production. The first half of the course will be spent familiarizing ourselves with the established scholarly literature (i.e. the historiography). Students will devote the second half of the semester conducting independent research and writing (and re-writing). Students are expected to produce a research paper that combines primary and secondary sources on topics related to the main themes of the course.

26:510:543 Topics in World History: World War II in Asia              
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

Daniel Asen

World War II (1939-1945) was unprecedented in its global scope, its mobilization of and impact on civilians, and its destructiveness. This conflict transformed the technologies and organization of warfare and ushered in a new era of international politics defined by powerful ideological rifts and the threat of nuclear war. From the perspective of many in Asia, the outbreak of WWII was inseparable from earlier trends surrounding Japan’s stunningly successful industrialization and the country’s expanding political and economic influence over other societies in East Asia and Southeast Asia. For Japanese, Chinese, Koreans, and others, WWII was thus connected to deeper conflicts and tensions of modernity, colonialism, race, and pan-Asian ideology.

In this graduate reading seminar, we will read journal articles and books that have transformed scholarly understandings of the contexts, meaning, and consequences of WWII as it unfolded in Asia and globally. Some of the themes that we will explore include the rise and decline of empires, the relationship between national, regional, and global scales of human activity, the social, political, and ideological dimensions of war, and critical approaches to the study of race, ethnicity, and identity.

26:510:551 American Intellectual and Cultural History: Introduction to American Studies
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
Ruth Feldstein

This graduate seminar will introduce students to scholarship in American Studies, as we explore together where the field has been and where it is going. We will be reading influential older articles and books; theoretical work that has had a particularly significant impact on American Studies; and newer studies which suggest the issues with which scholars of American Studies are currently engaged.

26:510:552 American Intellectual and Cultural History: American Art and Its Publics Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
Mark Krasovic

This graduate reading course will meet regularly at the Newark Museum and use its artistic and archival collections as a launching pad to an exploration of a broad, oftentimes contentious, debate over the role of art in American society. We will begin with a consideration of museum and library pioneer John Cotton Dana’s arguments for art’s crucial place in the early-twentieth-century modern city and watch as such ideas are spun out, expanded, and contested over the next hundred years. Topics will likely include the introduction of modern art to America; state funding for the arts during the New Deal and Great Society eras; art’s uses during the Cold War; debates over artistic representation, especially as informed by racial, gender, and sexual politics; and the commercial market’s role in shaping American art in an era of increasing economic inequality. Throughout, our discussions will be informed by specific artists and exhibitions (the 1913 Armory exhibition, Harlem on My Mind (1969), Robert Mapplethorpe, e.g.) as they both shape and are shaped by key developments in twentieth-century American history.

26:510:565 Public History: Community, Place and Public Humanities
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm

Mary Rizzo

In this public humanities/history graduate seminar, students will work with a community partner on a project about local history for the public. The class will ground students in the history, theory, and methods of place-based public history and community engagement. Students will also engage in original research, using archival collections, digitized materials, and/or oral history, over the semester to develop the class' public project.

26:510:586 Immigration in the United States
Tuesdays, 2:30-5:20pm

Steven Diner

This course examines the history of immigration to cities and urban areas of the United States since the nineteenth century. It will consider the causes of immigration, the social, cultural and economic adaptation of various groups, return migration, the significance of race, the varied experience of different immigrant groups, the development of ethnic group identities, changing American policy and attitudes towards immigrants and ethnic groups , and the impact of immigration and ethnicity  on American society and culture. Class will consist of weekly discussions of assigned books. Class members will take turns leading these discussions. Students will be required to write an essay on the historiography of a particular immigrant group, a specific time period, some aspect of the immigrant experience, the impact of immigration on a particular city or how immigration has shaped America’s economy, political system, social institutions or culture.  A final essay discussing the broad issues considered in class is also required.

To register for the following course, simply fill out the NJIT Cross Registration Application  (http://registrar.newark.rutgers.edu/files/njit-crossregform-2012a.pdf) and return it to history@newark.rutgers.edu.

48:510:657 Topics in Environmental History: Food in American Society
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
Neil Maher

We often think of food as simply something we eat.  Yet in recent years scholars in the growing field of environmental history have challenged this view, arguing instead that food forges and dramatically alters relationships between people and nature. These relationships can be biological, economic, political, cultural, and deeply personal.  Moreover, while we may believe that we lose some of these connections to the environment soon after we grow and harvest our food, process and package it, and then consume it, in undertaking those actions we are actually connecting ourselves to nature, and other people, in new ways.  Food, in other words, is much more than about what we put into our mouths.  This reading course will serve as an introduction to food history within the field of environmental history.  Over the course of the semester students will explore such topics as the rise of agribusiness, our increasing dependence on processed food and its health implications, and the birth of the organic food movement.  We will also analyze food through the broader historical the themes of labor, gender, ethnicity, politics, and cultural identity.

Summer 2016

26:510:618 Seminar in Teaching History
Emily Straus
Session II (July 11-Aug. 17), Mondays and Wednesdays 5:30-9:00pm

This course challenges students to investigate, reflect upon, and demonstrate exploration of current best practices in research and teaching history at the secondary level.  It is aimed at those enrolled in the Master of Arts for Teachers (MAT) program and/or those already engaged in teaching.  The goal is to guide and challenge teachers in how to integrate cutting-edge historical scholarship into their teaching.  To that end, readings and activities in graduate-level historical scholarship, modern pedagogy and educational research,  teaching methods and contemporary education issues as they relate to the teaching of history will be the focus of readings, discussion, activities, writing assignments, and assessments.

Spring 2016

26:510:504 Narrative History: Creative/Non-Fiction Writing Workshop
James Goodman
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing. Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism. Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor. We shall also read a wide range of non-fiction, but not an enormous number of pages per week.  I do not want your reading to interfere with the writing you are doing for this workshop or for the poetry or fiction workshop you may be taking at the same time. Permission of the instructor is required for registration (goodmanj@andromeda.rutgers.edu).

26:510:526 African American History Research Seminar
Ruth Feldstein
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

In this graduate research seminar, students will learn how (or continue) to research and write a primary source-based original essay on any aspect of African American history.  For the first half of the semester we will focus on common readings from different time periods and subdisciplines—with a general focus on historicizing recent black lives matter activism; the second half of the semester will be oriented toward the research and writing process.

26:510:533 Introduction to Digital Public Humanities
Mary Rizzo
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm

What happens when we make digital humanities public? What about when we take the public humanities and make them digital? This course will explore the history, theory and methods of the digital humanities and the public humanities and, especially, their intersection. We will use and critically examine digital tools like Omeka, mapping software, content management systems, and social media to put theory into practice. By the end of the semester, students will have conceptualized a digital public humanities project, written a grant application for potential funding, and built a prototype. 

26:510:537 Problems in Ancient History: Athenian Democracy
Gary Farney
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm

This course will examine the history and development of the Classical Athenian Democracy (primarily of the fifth and fourth centuries BC). Special attention will be paid to: the origins of Greek democracy; the precise functioning of the Athenian democracy; the relationship between democracy and empire in the Greek world; and Greek intellectual opinion of democracy. We will be examining a variety of ancient sources as our primary sources (in English translation): works of Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Euripides, Plutarch, Demosthenes, Plato and Aristotle will be among these.

26:510:549 Latin America and the World
Karen Caplan
Wednesdays, 5:00-7:40pm

In this course, we will investigate the multifaceted relationship between Latin American places, nations, and people and the rest of the world. How has that relationship shaped Latin America, and how has Latin America shaped the history of other places? Beginning with the colonial era and bringing the story up to the present, we will ask how the culture, politics, and economics of Latin American society fit into a global narrative. In the process, we will define and interrogate concepts like “influence,” “exploitation,” “imperialism,” and “cooperation.” We will at times ask very specific questions about particular kinds of relationships—between Spain and its American colonies, between the United States and Latin America, or between Latin American nations and their neighbors.  But will also constantly be exploring how we might build a narrative of Latin American history that both is globally informed and informs the global.

26:510:565 Public History: Community Engagement and Site-Specific Storytelling
Lyra Monteiro
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:40pm

As part of the Rutgers—Newark Newest Americans project, students in this graduate course will work together to create, from start to finish, a site-specific public humanities project. The course will begin with foundational reading in the field of public humanities and in the history of Newark. Students will then perform archival and audience research in the University Heights neighborhood and the RBHS campus, using a range of techniques, including the Stanford d.school’s Design Thinking framework, as well as methods for creating community-based projects developed by the Laundromat Project and The Museum On Site. The final product of this course will be a site-specific exhibition or performance, located on the RBHS campus and the surrounding community, which shares information about the past and present of the area and the communities that inhabit it.

 

Fall 2015

26:510:533:01 Radical Film History (Research Seminar)
Whitney Strub
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm

This research seminar will begin with an historical overview of efforts to link film to a radical praxis, from the silent era through digital production. While primarily centered on the United States, the scope will be global, ranging from Latin American Third Cinema to Chris Marker’s attempts to create a participatory workers’ cinema in post-1968 France. Other topics might include films of the Popular Front era, the Hollywood Ten, Black filmmaking and the “L.A. Rebellion” school, Newsreel and the New Left, queer and feminist film, and the cinema of postcolonial resistance movements. While close textual analysis will mark our studies, we will also foreground historical questions of production, distribution, and reception. Students will write an original research paper engaging with a specific history of radical film.

26:510:551:01 Introduction to American Studies
Timothy Stewart-Winter
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

This graduate seminar will introduce students to scholarship in American Studies, as we explore together where the field has been and where it is going.  We will be reading influential older articles and books; theoretical work that has had a particularly significant impact on American Studies; newer studies which suggest the issues with which scholars of American Studies are currently engaged, and collections of articles addressing the state and future of the field.

26:510:551:02 Cultural History and Cultural Studies
Ruth Feldstein
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

Beginning from the premise that “culture matters,” this graduate seminar will explore when, how, and in what specific ways scholars working from various disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives have engaged with culture, cultural history, and cultural studies as categories and as methods.

26:510:552:01 The American Modern and Postmodern
Mark Krasovic
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

This graduate reading seminar will track the intellectual and cultural history of notions of the modern and postmodern in the United States. We will consider various applications of these terms across time, not so much to settle on definitions, but in order to gain greater understanding of their history and the uses (and abuses) to which they have been put, and in order to use them in our own work more deliberately.

Though we will visit other times and places as the flows of language and ideas dictate, our focus will be on the United States since the late nineteenth century. We will consider notions of the modern rooted deep in the Renaissance and Enlightenment, explore debates about how applicable those ideas are in other national and historical contexts, and then turn to America at the turn of the twentieth century. Why do we call that period America’s modern era? What does that have to do with culture? The economy? Politics? Can we locate a corresponding postmodern era of American history? If so, what are its contours and defining characteristics in terms of, again, culture, the economy, and politics? What does it have to do with postmodern theory? What is that anyway, where did it come from, and why did it gain such influence in the U.S.? And since, as we will see, notions of the modern and postmodern are so intertwined with those of “the human,” what does this all mean for the broad field in which we work: the humanities? In that way, the course will offer a broad survey of American art and thought since the late nineteenth century.

In our attempt to address such questions and put some meat on the terms “modern” and “postmodern,” we will look closely at a range of primary and secondary sources, including historical scholarship, films, paintings, fiction, critical theory, and the urban landscape.

26:510:543:01 Body Politics in Modern China
Daniel Asen
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

From the early 20th-century notion of China as the “Sick Man of East Asia” to the opening ceremony of the 2008 Olympic Games, the body has been integral to Chinese conceptions of nationalism, race and ethnicity, population, and power. China’s unequal engagements with industrializing Europe, United States, and Japan during the mid-late 1800s gave rise to new perceptions of the Chinese body as “pathological,” a potent symbol of national weakness which was connected to broader discourses of race and civilization. Over the 20th century, China’s drive to modernize has likewise involved a series of attempts to control and “improve” bodies by implementing a modern healthcare system, new regimes of physical training and sport, population control policies, and even eugenics. In the process, some traditional ideas about the body have been displaced while others – for example, Traditional Chinese Medicine – have been successfully adapted to modernity.

In this class, we will draw on methods and insights from the history and anthropology of the body to rethink core narratives of 19th and 20th-century Chinese history and, more broadly, global history. Our readings and class discussions will touch on an eclectic set of concerns drawn from social and political history, history of science, technology, and medicine, and critical approaches to the study of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. This reading seminar will address questions of broad relevance for students who work in different regional fields and with varied thematic interests. Given that the “body politics” examined in this class have parallels in many other modern societies, students will be encouraged to think about comparative cases and transnational connections.

26:510:565:01 Public History and Mass Incarceration
Mary Rizzo
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm

How can we start a public conversation about mass incarceration? Public history is the co-creation of historical knowledge between historians and the public. This course will ground students in the theory, methods, and practices of public history and the public humanities to consider how to engage the public with the history of mass incarceration. Using case studies, we will examine how public historians have delved into the challenges and opportunities that arise when dealing with, in James and Lois Horton's words, "the tough stuff of American memory," including slavery, trauma, violence, and structural inequality. We will also examine the broader scholarship on mass incarceration, but because much public history work is local, our focus will be on the Elizabeth Detention Center. This course is part of an international project, the Humanities Action Lab (HAL), which uses public history and the public humanities to raise critical conversations about contemporary issues. Among other activities, students will create a panel on the Elizabeth Detention Center for a traveling exhibition on mass incarceration, blog for HAL's website, and potentially engage in cross-campus collaboration with students in other HAL courses nationwide.

To register for this course, simply fill out the NJIT Cross Registration Application  (http://registrar.newark.rutgers.edu/files/njit-crossregform-2012a.pdf) and return it to history@newark.rutgers.edu.

48:510:656: Topics in the History of Health: Race, Culture, and Medicine in the Twentieth Century
Stephen Pemberton
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm

“Of all forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.”
Martin Luther King, Jr., 1966

Even as medicine and public health have witnessed unprecedented advances in the management of disease and health over the past hundred years, there remains a persistent gap between those who benefit from such “progress” and those who do not. This gap is not sufficiently explained by socio-economic factors alone, but requires recognition of racial and ethnic disparities that are deeply ingrained in the history and cultures of modernizing societies.

This graduate seminar in comparative medical and health history examines how race, culture, and science have figured prominently in the management of disease and health in the past century. The course readings and assignments will focus on the health status of “non-white” peoples during the twentieth century, with particular attention to the persistent disparities that people of color have experienced in health outcomes in the United States and other parts of the world.  Of critical concern in this course is the contested question of organized medicine’s status as form of “social control” in modernizing societies. Another interpretive focus is the ways that the organization of medical care has confronted, or failed to confront, social justice in medical treatment and research as well as in public health. 

There will be at least ten books to read over the course of the semester with a selection of additional essays.  Among the authors we will be reading are Warwick Anderson, Franz Fanon, Julie Livingston, Richard Keller, Jonathan Metzl, Alondra Nelson, Rebecca Skloot, Keith Wailoo, and Harriet A. Washington.

Summer 2015

26:510:546 Twentieth-Century Europe
Jon Cowans
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6:00-9:30pm (5/26-7/02)

Examining Europe’s twentieth century through the lenses of political, economic, intellectual, social, and cultural history, this course uses relatively short primary- and secondary-source readings to explore topics such as the two world wars; the advent of radio; the Spanish Civil War; the ideology and practice of communism and fascism; postwar reconstruction and human-rights trials; conflicts over decolonization and immigration; rebellion and rock music in the 1960s; the fall of communism; and collective memories of an often-traumatic but fascinating century.

Spring 2015

26:510:504 Narrative History: CREATIVE/NON-FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP
James Goodman
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing. Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism. Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor. We shall also read a wide range of non-fiction, but not an enormous number of pages per week.  I do not want your reading to interfere with the writing you are doing for this workshop or for the poetry or fiction workshop you may be taking at the same time. Permission of the instructor is required for registration.

26:510:543 Topics in World History: POSTWAR: AFTERMATHS OF WORLD WAR II
Susan Carruthers
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm

World War II claimed in excess of 60 million lives: victims of combat, aerial bombardment, disease, famine, and calculated annihilation. When it ended, the victorious Allies quickly disagreed over how best to tackle questions of humanitarian relief and political reconstruction that confronted their own societies as well as those of the defeated Axis powers and their former empires. The tumultuous years immediately after the war saw the birth of the nuclear age; the division of Europe; the onset of the Cold War; the reconstitution of colonial empires in Asia and Africa; and the inauguration of the United Nations. This course examines the period from 1945 to 1950 by adopting a thematic approach to wartime legacies and postwar challenges. Topics will include: hunger and the politics of food; sexual violence; demobilization and homecoming; refugee politics; military occupation; the atomic era; and human rights. Weekly readings will generally comprise a number of scholarly articles rather than single monographs. These will be studied alongside selected primary source materials, including films, diaries, letters, and fiction from the late 1940s. The overall objective is to gain a multi-faceted appreciation of both "postwar" and the multiple optics that historians have applied to this period's interpretation. We will thus read new scholarship in the fields of transnational history; the history of gender and sexuality; the history of emotions; refugee and Holocaust studies, and works of cultural critique drawn from disciplines outside History.

Assessment will be based on class participation; two short response papers, and a final longer paper.

26:510:585 American History 1945-: RESEARCH SEMINAR ON U.S. HISTORY, 1945-1990
Beryl Satter
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm

This seminar is devoted to researching and writing a substantial, footnoted research paper (approximately thirty pages in length, typed and double spaced, approximately 250 words per page) on some aspect of U.S. history between 1945 and 1990.  We will spend the first few weeks reading influential historical work on this period.  Class meetings will lead you through the step-by-step process of writing a research paper, including primary source research and analysis, the presentation of polished project proposals and the creation of outlines of your thesis. Some class sessions will be set aside for individual conferences, and others for group discussion.

Your research paper will be due in draft form well before the end of the seminar, so that it can go through several major revisions.  Since revision is a process that is crucial to effective historical research and writing, we will devote class time to discussion of each of two drafts of your research project that you must complete a few days before the dates indicated in the syllabus below.  Students will meet with the professor on an individual basis to discuss their projects and revisions and also work together on their papers, meeting in small groups with other students to discuss and critique each other's work.

**To register for the following NJIT courses, simply complete a NJIT Cross Registration form available at http://registrar.newark.rutgers.edu/exchange-njit-graduate and email it to history@newark.rutgers.edu.**

48:510:628 Gender, Science, and Technology in the Modern World
Alison Lefkowitz
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

Historians have repeatedly reminded us that science is not value-neutral. Instead it inevitably reflects the context in which scientists work. This course examines the history of science with particular attention to the critical insights of historians of gender and sexuality. We will consider not only how and why women were marginalized in scientific and technological fields, but also the broader relationship between science and structures of gendered power. Finally we will consider how science helped create and recreate our gender and sexual identities. The course is primarily US-based. Readings will focus on birth control, Darwin, household technology, eugenics, the nature of sexual desire, scientific management, ecofeminism, and other topics. 

48:510:638 Social History of Communication
Richard Sher
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

This course examines communication as a social and historical phenomenon, subject to variation according to time and place, yet always central to human activity. Themes will include orality and literacy; the rise of printing; the information revolution of the Enlightenment; the emergence of electric and electronic communication technologies; and specialized uses of communication such as propaganda.

Fall 2014

26:510:506 Poetics of History: The Place of the Author in Her or His Story
James Goodman
5:30-8:10pm

In this graduate seminar (which like all the courses in my history writing sequence of courses is part graduate reading course and part graduate writing workshop) we shall explore the author’s place in historical narrative and interpretation (and in narrative and creative non-fiction more generally). Everyone knows, everyone understands, that the author is there – that the author is everywhere -- choosing the topic, planning and carrying out the research, deciding what approach to take, where to begin and where to end, what to include and what to leave out, and writing the book from introduction to conclusion. Why is it, then, that academic authors (and a great many non-academic authors of history and general non-fiction) have been absent from their texts for more than a century now (and to this day remain scarce)?   If they appear anywhere it is in their acknowledgments. What does it mean that today more and more authors are writing themselves into their narratives and interpretations in the first-person singular: “I.”  Perhaps we’ll start with the great Gibbon, who called “I” the “most disgusting of pronouns,” though in his Decline and Fall he himself used that pronoun (and wrote himself into his story) countless times.

26:510:533 Topics in American History: Race and Labor in the Americas
Kornel Chang
Mondays, 5:00-7:40pm

The late Stuart Hall once wrote that race is “the modality in which class is lived,” the medium through which class relations are experienced and “fought through.” Using Hall’s insights as a point of departure, this reading intensive course examines the modern history of race, labor, and capitalism in the Americas. The spread of capitalist relations introduced a spectrum of “free” and “unfree” labor between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries. Our readings will focus on how different labor systems—slavery, indentured, wage labor, and guestworker programs—produced, and were produced by, racial knowledge and systems of meaning. Through a series of case studies, students will trace the ways race and class were co-constituted in the Americas and how they evolved with changing modes of capitalist production. In doing so, students will also explore the ways race and class intersected with gender, nation, region, sex, and empire. Students will be expected to read a book monograph and an article per week, amounting to about 250 pages of reading per week.

26:510:537 Problems in Ancient History: Ancient Historians and Historiography
Gary Farney
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

This course will examine the process of writing history in the Greek and Roman worlds, and the value of the works of ancient historians for studying ancient history. We will read a wide variety of history in its sub-genres (annalistic, ethnography, geography, biography and contemporary history) and various historians in the course of the class, including Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenpohon, Polybius, Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, Suetonius, Plutarch, Ammianus Marcellinus and Procopius. We will also examine a large selection of modern secondary literature about ancient historiography.

26:510:551 Introduction to American Studies
Timothy Stewart-Winter
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

This graduate seminar will introduce students to scholarship in American Studies, as we explore together where the field has been and where it is going.  We will be reading influential older articles and books; theoretical work that has had a particularly significant impact on American Studies; newer studies which suggest the issues with which scholars of American Studies are currently engaged, and collections of articles addressing the state and future of the field.

26:510:552 American Intellectual and Cultural History: Cultures of US Capitalism
Mark Krasovic
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

The history of capitalism has become, lately, a hot field in American history. Yet for many years – maybe since Karl Marx wrote about base and superstructure, and certainly since Raymond Williams offered cultural materialism as a valuable revision to Marx’s model – cultural historians and critics have grappled with the relationship among capitalist development and the world of art and thought. Now seems a particularly fruitful moment to take stock of the new boom in historical writing about U.S. capitalism and to consider what it contributes to a much longer consideration of the relationship between economics and American thought and culture.

In this graduate reading seminar, therefore, we will study some of the classic models of thought on that relationship (including Marx and Williams) before reading a range of monographs that, in one way or another, dynamically consider that relationship in an American context. Readings will span a broad swath of American history, from the Revolution, through the early and late industrial periods, and into whatever we might call today.

26:510:565 Presenting the Past: Public Histories of Slavery for the Twenty-First Century
Lyra Monteiro
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm

The Best Picture win of "12 Years A Slave" at the 2014 Oscars came just over a year before the Smithsonian plans to open the National Museum of African American History and Culture, located between the Washington Monument and the White House. This increased attention to the history and legacy of slavery in the United States is part of a larger international trend, which this course explores. By looking at the various ways in which the history of African enslavement in the New World has been remembered and interpreted in contexts ranging from historic sites and museum exhibitions to children’s literature and film, students will build towards developing their own proposals for new public interpretations of the history of slavery. We will use the history of African enslavement in the New World—a history that touches all of Western Europe, Western and Southern Africa, and the Americas—as a lens into the ways in which different countries and regions have publicly remembered a difficult past. Some of the issues we will explore in this class include: how the method, time, and place in which the past is narrated affect the story that can be told; the tensions between histories created for different kinds of audiences, including locals, tourists, and various descendant communities; and the ways in which the narration of slavery’s history changes over time.

In order to address this topic, we will focus on the “primary documents” of public memory, including specific monuments, exhibitions, blogs, and plays. We will supplement this study with readings from the growing body of scholarship on the public history and public memory of slavery, coming out of disciplines including History, Archaeology, Sociology, and American Studies. As a final project, students will develop and present grant proposals for new public interpretations of the history and legacy of slavery, in a venue of their choice.

26:510:583 U.S. History, 1890-1945
Beryl Satter
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm

During the first half of the twentieth century the U.S. made the transition from a Victorian producer culture to a modern consumer culture.  This transition entailed dramatic shifts in U.S. racial ideologies, gender relations, immigration trends, and patterns of labor, leisure, and sexuality.  During these same years Americans engaged in two major periods of political reform (the Progressive Era, 1890-1920, and the New Deal, 1933-38), and participated in two world wars as well as several lesser known wars and interventions.  To understand how historians have interpreted these complex changes and events, we will read studies that utilize a wide variety of approaches, including religious history, political history, biography, labor history, legal history, diplomatic history, social and cultural history, and histories of gender and sexuality. 

26:510:585 America in the 1960s and 1970s: Research Seminar
Ruth Feldstein
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm

In this research seminar, we will explore a range of subjects that concern scholars of the 1960s and 70s and consider the methods that these scholars use to research and write about this period in U.S. history. Graduate students will then research and write original scholarship on this period.

During the first half of the semester, we will read secondary sources intensively.  During the second half of the semester, we will focus more on process. In workshops and one-on-one meetings, we will consider how to develop research questions and define research topics, how to find sources, and how to work with documents and interpret these sources.  We will also focus on how to outline, draft, write, and revise seminar papers in ways that that incorporate these research techniques.

26:510:586 American Immigration
Steven Diner
Thursdays, 2:00-4:40pm

This course examines the history of immigration to cities and urban areas of the United States since the nineteenth century. It will consider the causes of immigration, the social, cultural and economic adaptation of various groups, return migration, the significance of race, the varied experience of different immigrant groups, the development of ethnic group identities, changing American policy and attitudes towards immigrants and ethnic groups, and the impact of immigration and ethnicity on American society and culture. Class will consist of weekly discussions of assigned books. Students will be required to write an essay on the historiography of a particular immigrant group, a specific time period, some aspect of the immigrant experience, the impact of immigration on a particular city or how immigration has shaped America’s economy, political system, social institutions or culture.

48:510:657 Topics in Environmental History: The American City
Neil Maher
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm

Americans often think of cities as being devoid of nature.  Yet in recent years, scholars in the growing field of urban environmental history have challenged this view, arguing instead that cities and the natural environment have deep connections and shared histories.  With urbanization a central theme of the American story, and more than eighty percent of present-day Americans living in urban areas, we cannot fully understand America’s past without understanding how nature and cities have shaped one another, and in doing so influenced the people living both within and beyond city limits.  Over the course of the semester, students will explore such topics as the role nature played in geographically situating cities across the American landscape; early cultural reactions to industrialization and urbanization; the important economic relationship between cities and their hinterlands; the development of public parks for recreation and the migration of wealthier, and usually white, citizens to the suburbs; political activism over pollution, public health, and urban sprawl; and the rise of the urban environmental justice movement.  Readings will include William Cronon, Nature's Metropolis (Chicago); Andrew Hurley, Environmental Inequalities (Gary, Indiana); Michael Rawson, Eden on the Charles (Boston); Mike Davis, Ecology of Fear (Los Angeles); Adam Rome, The Bulldozer in the Countryside (suburbia); and others.

Summer 2014

26:510:503 Historiography: Historiography of the African Diaspora
Andrew Daily
Mondays and Wednesdays, 6:00-9:15pm

Since the 1993 publication of Paul Gilroy's "The Black Atlantic," Black Diaspora has emerged as a significant historiographical field. Thinking of the Atlantic as a space of movement and exchange - both unfree and free - the diasporic perspective has led to reconsiderations of the slave trade, New World black cultures, black nationalism and consciousness, new understandings of culture, music, and religion, and transnational approaches to both politics and the subject. This course draws on literatures from Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States, as well as the emerging literature on 'Black Europe,' in order to introduce the major questions and methods that structure the study of the Black Diaspora, and to show how this course of study has reshaped the historiography in many fields ranging from religious studies to anthropology, from Mexican history to French history, from studies of slavery to studies of capitalism. This course proposes that understanding the historiography of Black Disapora is vital to understanding the emergence and expansion of transnational and transcultural studies across the humanities.

Spring 2014

26:510:504 Narrative History: Non-Fiction Writing Workshop
James Goodman
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing. Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism. Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor. Permission of the instructor is required for registration.

26:510:533 Topics in American History: Sexuality and Sexual Politics
Timothy Stewart-Winter
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This graduate seminar will examine classic and more recent texts dealing with sexuality and power, primarily in the U.S. but with attention to transnational phenomena and experiences. Readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines and will attend closely to the intersections of sexuality with gender and gender identity, science, race, class, social movements, literature, and urban and suburban cultures and politics. Students will also gain experience in analyzing of primary documents in relation to histories of sexuality and gender.

26:510:534 Topics in American History: Cities and Suburbs in American Culture
Robert Snyder
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
In this research seminar, we will explore cities, suburbs and their relationship in everything from the arts to intellectual history to ways of life. We’ll being by reading some theoretical works and then move on to illuminating books. We’ll also visit archives in Newark, New York City and online where you can begin to pursue your research. In the second half of the semester you’ll work more independently on researching, drafting and revising your essays. The seminar is designed to accommodate a wide range of topics, perspectives and methodological approaches. Our only core requirement is that that you treat a city, a suburb or their relationship as a significant dimension of your analysis. Seminar participants are expected to finish the semester with a well-developed essay that can become a conference presentation, a published article or a chapter in an MA thesis or doctoral dissertation.

26:510:543 Topics in World History: Cities and the Urban in China, 1800-present
Daniel Asen
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
Cities have played an essential role in China’s transformation from an advanced early modern empire into a modern nation-state and rising global superpower. Under the old imperial system cities served as centers of trade, cosmopolitan culture, and ritual practice. Beginning in the mid-19th century, China’s integration into a global system dominated by Western countries transformed many coastal and inland Chinese cities into sites of rapid economic and technological transformation and political and social upheaval. Following the 1949 communist revolution and reengagement with the global economy in the post-Mao period, cities have once again emerged as crucial sites for a developmental drive that has been as destructive and displacing as it has been transformative.

This graduate reading seminar explores urban history in China from the perspectives of comparative and global history. Many of the questions that we will explore have broad relevance, especially for students with an interest in urban history of other regions and periods: How are boundaries of class, race, and ethnicity established, consolidated, or challenged in urban spaces and institutions? How have the meanings of everyday life, work, and leisure changed in industrial societies? How has modern globalization impacted the well-being and health of urban communities? Who are the winners and losers of urbanization and “development”? How are modern cities policed and what are the politics of “orderly” urban spaces? Students will be encouraged to think about these questions comparatively, to explore connections between China and other world regions, and to think critically about the interplay between historiography, critical theory, and specific cases in the study of history.

26:510:545 Nineteenth-Century Europe: the History of Emotions
Eva Giloi
Mondays 5:00-7:40pm
Love, hate, fear: these seem to be universal emotions. Yet as historians are increasingly discovering, emotions have a history: people have not always felt as they do now. This begs the question: how do large-scale changes in emotional experience come about? If people aren’t born with ‘natural’ emotions, how do they learn to feel? Or more fundamentally: how are emotions generated – through the brain’s chemistry; through the body’s movement in the everyday environment; through conscious and semi-conscious social interactions? Such questions preoccupy scholars who study emotions from a wide range of disciplines.

Against this background, this course examines the newly emerging field of the ‘history of emotions,’ and asks a further meta-question: how do historical subfields develop? As historians break new methodological ground, their work sometimes coalesces into recognized subfields, for instance, recently, in ‘environmental history’ or ‘trans-border history.’ Some thirty years ago, ‘cultural history’ was a newly rising field, displacing social history in what Lynn Hunt then called the Cultural Turn. This methodological move inspired further sub-fields, from the ‘spatial turn’ to the ‘visual turn’ to the ‘history of everyday life.’ Most recently, the ‘history of emotions’ has become one of the hottest new cultural fields, but one that, in its newness, is both amorphous and hotly contested.

In sum: this course focuses on the methodologies historians use to excavate the history of emotions, and the controversies that have arisen from these new methodologies. Its center of gravity lies in modern Europe, but it also draws on influential texts from other regions (for instance the USA) and other scholarly disciplines (neuroscience, anthropology, queer studies) where appropriate.

26:510:551 American Intellectual and Cultural History: From Cultural History to Cultural Studies
Ruth Feldstein
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
Beginning from the premise that "culture matters," this graduate seminar will explore when, how, and in what specific ways scholars working from various disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives have engaged with culture, cultural history, and cultural studies as categories and as methods. Students have the option of writing a research paper, though doing so is not a requirement of the seminar.

26:510:563 Topics in Health History: The Black Death: Disease, Society, and History
Nukhet Varlik
Wednesdays, 5:00-7:40pm
This course is devoted to the study of the Black Death, one of the greatest pandemics in human history. We will keep the geographical and temporal scope of the course as broad as possible but the main focus will be Eurasia in the late medieval and early modern era. In this course, we will read and discuss the available historical scholarship on this pandemic and learn how to incorporate research findings produced in fields, such as bioarcheology, microbiology, and archeozoology into historical research. No previous background in sciences is required.

26:510:618 Seminar in Teaching History
Elizabeth Aaron
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course challenges students to investigate, reflect upon, and demonstrate exploration of current best practices in research and teaching history at the secondary level.  It is aimed at those enrolled in the Master of Arts for Teachers (MAT) program and/or those already engaged in teaching.  The goal is to guide and challenge teachers in how to integrate cutting-edge historical scholarship into their teaching.  To that end, readings and activities in graduate-level historical scholarship, modern pedagogy and educational research,  teaching methods and contemporary education issues as they relate to the teaching of history will be the focus of readings, discussion, activities, writing assignments, and assessments

**To register for the following NJIT course, simply complete a NJIT Cross Registration form available at http://registrar.newark.rutgers.edu/exchange-njit-graduate and email it to history@newark.rutgers.edu.

48:510:632 Technology, Culture, and History
Richard Sher
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course will treat the relationships between technology and culture in a variety of historical and geographical settings. It will examine the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life and the ways that technologies are adapted and exchanged by different societies. It will also consider environmental and organic factors underlying technological developments; connections between technology and concepts of time and space; technology in relation to the study of 20th-century global history; and the culture of “technological communities” – both historical and fictional.

Fall 2013

26:510:525 Colloquium on the History of Women: Research Seminar on U.S. Women’s and Gender History
Beryl Satter
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This seminar is devoted to researching and writing a substantial, footnoted research paper (approximately thirty pages in length, typed and double spaced, approximately 250 words per page) on some aspect of U.S. women’s or gender history.  We will spend the first few weeks reading influential historical work on U.S. women’s and gender history.  Class meetings will lead you through the step-by-step process of writing a research paper, including primary source research and analysis, the presentation of polished project proposals and the creation of outlines of your thesis. Some class sessions will be set aside for individual conferences, and others for group discussion.

Your research paper will be due in draft form well before the end of the seminar, so that it can go through several major revisions.  Since revision is a process that is crucial to effective historical research and writing, we will devote class time to discussion of each of two drafts of your research project that you must complete a few days before the dates indicated in the syllabus below.  Students will meet with the professor on an individual basis to discuss their projects and revisions and also work together on their papers, meeting in small groups with other students to discuss and critique each other's work.

26:510:533 Topics in American History: Slavery and Freedom in American History
Clement Price
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course will explore the complicated trajectory of historiographical literature on slavery and emancipation in the United States, drawing from the increasingly complementary fields of African American and American history. The course will focus on the centrality of slavery as a racialized labor system, a way of life for blacks and whites, and an oppressive crucible in the southern states during the ante-bellum period.  That the course is offered during the sesquicentennial of the ending of slavery in the United States, it will examine the importance of slavery and freedom in American life, as well as efforts by African Americans, and other Americans, to give meaning to what President Lincoln, at Gettysburg, called “a new birth of freedom.” 

26:510:534 Topics in American History: History of Urban Education in the United States
Steven Diner
Wednesdays, 2:30-5:10 pm
This course examines the history of urban education in the United States. It provides an historical foundation for understanding urban educational policy today. It is required for students in the PhD in Urban Systems, and open to students in the PhD in American Studies and the M.A. in History. Assigned readings explore the development of urban school systems in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the rise of school reform movements and the development of urban educational policies designed to improve urban schools; the recruitment and training of urban school teachers; the role of race, immigration, ethnicity and class in educational performance; the rise of bureaucracy and scientific management; suburbanization and its effects on urban schools; desegregation and its impact; the effect of deindustrialization on urban schools; and the debate over  equity versus excellence. The course is taught as a colloquium, discussing an assigned book each week. Active participation in these discussions is required of all students. In addition, students will prepare a research paper based on secondary literature, and will present their findings orally during the last two weeks of the class.

26:510:537 Topics in World History: Evolution of the Global System
Susan Carruthers
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:40 pm
Since the end of the cold war, “globalization” has been a ubiquitous buzzword—endlessly repeated, yet poorly understood and susceptible to myriad interpretations. Is it shrinking and compressing time and space, creating a “borderless world”? Is it producing a homogenous “McWorld,” or widening disparities between the global haves and have-nots, and occasioning increasingly violent forms of resistance? Or might it be simultaneously binding and fracturing communities far distant from one another?

This course takes as its starting point an understanding of “globalization” as more than simply a convenient label to denote the period since the cold war's collapse. It therefore sets out to trace the historical trajectory of a variety of globalizing processes. Topics covered include the emergence and development of a capitalist world economy; the rise and demise of colonial empires; the expansion of global trade (in commodities and human beings); connections between war and globalization; and the emergence of a “neo-liberal” order.

Readings are derived from scholars in a variety of disciplines—history, political theory, anthropology—supplemented by non-academic sources, including literature and film. The course centers, in particular, on Africa as a limit-case: both a challenge to, and corroboration of, particular ways of theorizing globalization.

Assessment will be based on weekly short responses to the readings; class participation; and a long final paper.

26:510:549 Topics in Latin-American History: Making of Race in Latin America, 1492-Present
Karen Caplan
Mondays, 5:00-7:40 pm
Since 1492, Latin America has been the site of intense encounters between indigenous people, people of European descent, and people of African descent. In turn, Latin Americans have developed complex and perhaps unique ways of conceiving of distinctions among and between themselves. Beginning with the pre-history of European conquest and ending in the late twentieth century, this course asks how and why such distinctions developed, and what impact they have had on politics and culture in Latin America. Many historians have argued that Latin Americans, because of the high degree of intermixture between people of different backgrounds, have developed notions of difference based less on a concept of “race” than on one of “color.” This course will examine this claim and ask what—if anything—is indeed unique about Latin American social distinctions.

Moreover, as we approach the modern period, the course will also focus on questions about Latin America and the United States. First, is it useful to compare Latin American racial constructions with those of the U.S., given their shared histories of conquest and colonial encounter? And second, we will begin to discuss what has happened when Latin Americans, as part of a massive influx of immigrants, have brought their racial ideas and experiences to the U.S. with them.

26:510:551 American Intellectual and Cultural History: Introduction to American Studies
Timothy Stewart-Winter
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This class offers an intellectual mapping of American Studies as a field, with a consideration of where the field has been, where it is going, and the issues with which scholars of American Studies are currently engaged.

26:510:552 American Intellectual and Cultural History: The American Modern and Postmodern
Mark Krasovic
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
Despite no clear agreement on what they might mean, the words “modern” and “postmodern” are everywhere in scholarly and popular discourse. This reading seminar in intellectual and cultural history will consider various applications of these terms not so much to settle the matter once and for all, but in order to gain greater understanding of their history and the uses (and abuses) to which they have been put, and in order to use them in our own work more deliberately.

Though we will visit other times and places as the flows of language and ideas dictate, our focus will be on the United States since the late nineteenth century. We will consider notions of the modern rooted deep in the Renaissance and Enlightenment, explore debates about how applicable those ideas are in other national and historical contexts, and then turn to America at the turn of the twentieth century. Why do we call that period America’s modern era? What does that have to do with culture? The economy? Politics? Can we locate a corresponding postmodern era of American history? If so, what are its contours and defining characteristics in terms of, again, culture, the economy, and politics? What does it have to do with postmodern theory? What is that anyway, where did it come from, and why did it gain such influence in the U.S.? And since, as we will see, notions of the modern and postmodern are so intertwined with those of “the human,” what does this all mean for the broad field in which we work: the humanities? In that way, the course will offer a broad survey of American art and thought since the late nineteenth century.

In our attempt to address such questions and put some meat on the terms “modern” and “postmodern,” we will look closely at a range of primary and secondary sources, including historical scholarship, films, paintings, fiction, critical theory, and the urban landscape.

26:510:553 American Political and Legal History: Immigration History
Steven Diner
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course examines the history of immigration to cities and urban areas of the United States since the nineteenth century. It will consider the causes of immigration, the social, cultural and economic adaptation of various groups, return migration, the significance of race, the varied experience of different immigrant groups, the development of ethnic group identities, changing American policy and attitudes towards immigrants and ethnic groups , and the impact of immigration and ethnicity  on American society and culture. Class will consist of weekly discussions of assigned books. Students will be required to write an essay on the historiography of a particular immigrant group, a specific time period, some aspect of the immigrant experience, the impact of immigration on a particular city or how immigration has shaped America’s economy, political system, social institutions or culture.  

48:510:626 Social History of American Medicine Since 1800
Stephen Pemberton
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course provides an overview of the social history of medicine in the United States from the era of the early republic to the late twentieth century. The readings and discussions will utilize the histories of medicine, health and disease as a window onto a changing American society. We will see, for instance, how medical and health issues reflect and illuminate matters of class, race and gender in America, how social movements have impacted efforts to deliver medicine or otherwise promote health (including Jacksonian populism, 19th-century evangelical Protestantism, Civil Rights, and feminism), how industrialism, big business, and consumerism have influenced medical and public health practice, and how the federal government has invested in medicine and health and developed health care policy.  Topics also include the emergence of the medical profession; the relations between medical concepts, therapies, and mainstream social thought; the character of regular and alternative healing movements; the social context of medical innovation, experimentation, and progress; the social history of hospitals and other medical institutions; changing medical responses to infectious and chronic disease; as well as debates about health care in the United States. Of particular focus throughout the course will be the enduring roles of class, race, and gender in American social relations, medicine, and health practices.

Among the books we will read are:

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s A Midwife's Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812
Sharla Fett’s Working Cures: Healing, Health, and Power on Southern Slave Plantations
Alan Kraut’s Silent Travelers: Germs, Genes, and the Immigrant Menace
Barron Lerner’s The Breast Cancer Wars: Hope, Fear and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America
Gretchen Long’s Doctoring Freedom: The Politics of African American Medical Care in Slavery and Emancipation
David Oshinsky’s Polio: An American Story
Charles Rosenberg’s The Cholera Years: The United States in 1832, 1849, and 1866
Keith Wailoo’s Dying in the City of the Blues: Sickle Cell Anemia and the Politics of Race and Health
James Whorton’s Nature's Cures: The History of Alternative Medicine in America
 

Summer 2013

26:510:529: European Intellectual & Cultural History: EUROPE & THE WORLD
Mondays and Wednesdays 5:30-9:15 (5/28-7/5)
Andrew Daily                  
This seminar will introduce students to the major historiographical schools and methodological approaches to apprehending the history of modern Europe within a global, colonial, and transnational framework. In recent decades, influenced by the increasing pace of globalization and the increased visibility of diverse historical voices, scholars have begun to critically interrogate Europe within a global framework, questioning how the hermeticism of many traditional narratives of European history. Focusing attention on diverse phenomenon including colonialism and imperialism, emigration and immigration, transnational political, cultural, and intellectual movement, global military conflict, decolonization, mutating economic orders, and globalization, these approaches have broadened our understanding of European history, contributed new methodologies and opened up new archives, as well as revised previously held interpretations of the scope and breadth of the modern European experience. This course intends to introduce graduate students to this scholarship and to ask them to write critically and extensively on the contribution that globally-minded scholarship has made to European and national historiographies.

Spring 2013

26: 510:504 Narrative History: Non-Fiction Writing Workshop
James Goodman
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing. Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism. Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor. Permission of the instructor is required for registration.

26: 510:532 American Diplomatic History: Media and American War Experience-Research Seminar
Susan Carruthers
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
Since the birth of modern communication technologies in the late nineteenth century, war has been a staple of newsreels and motion pictures, newspaper columns and radio broadcasts. War, it is often said, sells. But war must also be sold, and the role mass media play in mobilizing support for particular engagements has never been free from controversy. Are the media too much part of an official “war machine” or insufficiently so? If opinion “wins wars,” as Eisenhower claimed during World War II, can it also lose them? And how far are media responsible for shaping individual and collective opinions?

Highly topical today, such questions have a long historical trajectory. Casting back to the Spanish-American-Cuban War of 1898, arguably the first US “media war,” this course will focus on a number of enduring themes: censorship and control; photography and perception; the war correspondent; Hollywood and the military.

This class is organized as a research seminar with a significant emphasis on acquiring research skills and working closely with primary sources, printed and visual. Assigned readings will provide a scholarly context for these investigations. But independent research will be a crucial component of this seminar as students work to produce a paper based primarily on archival findings: a scholarly project undertaken in supportive dialog with classmates and the instructor.

26:510:533 Topics in American History: History of US Occupations
Kornel Chang
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm
Over the last decade or so, historians have analyzed the history of U.S. occupations in new and fresh ways. Moving beyond the traditional realms of high politics, war, and diplomacy, scholars have approached American occupations, ranging from the U.S.-Mexico War to contemporary projections into the Middle East, from the perspectives of race, gender, migration, environment, public health, and policing. In reviewing what some are calling the “new” imperial history, this course will consider American power in the world, examining its evolving logic and internal contradictions, and how it has both changed and remained the same over time.

26:510:534 Topics in American History: History of Urban Education in the United States
Steven Diner
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course examines the history of urban education in the United States. It provides an historical foundation for understanding urban educational policy today. It is required for students in the PhD in Urban Systems, and open to students in the PhD in American Studies and the M.A. in History. Assigned readings explore the development of urban school systems in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the rise of school reform movements and the development of urban educational policies designed to improve urban schools; the recruitment and training of urban school teachers; the role of race, immigration, ethnicity and class in educational performance; the rise of bureaucracy and scientific management; suburbanization and its effects on urban schools; desegregation and its impact; the effect of deindustrialization on urban schools; and the debate over  equity versus excellence. The course is taught as a colloquium, discussing an assigned book each week. Active participation in these discussions is required of all students. In addition, students will prepare a research paper based on secondary literature, and will present their findings orally during the last two weeks of the class.

26:510:551 American Intellectual and Cultural History: Intro to American Studies-Research Seminar
Ruth Feldstein
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This research seminar is designed for graduate students to develop the skills needed to research and write a substantive, original, and interdisciplinary paper based on research in primary sources. During the first half of the semester, we will focus on sites in and around Newark that have been “jumping off points” for research—“traditional” archives, public institutions, neighborhood, communities, and more; we will also read intensively to consider how scholars from various disciplines have drawn on a range of interdisciplinary methods and theoretical frameworks to “use” these or related sites in their own scholarship. During the second half of the semester, we will focus on your own research and writing.  Through in-class workshops and small groups, we will consider how to develop research questions, how to define topics, how to find sources, and how to work with a range of primary sources while also engaging relevant scholarship. A longer-term goal is that you will research and write papers that will be relevant to your own thesis or dissertation; that you could present at a conference; or that you could submit for publication.

26:510:552 American Intellectual and Cultural History: Oral History 
Rob Snyder
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
In Oral History, we’ll explore the theory and practice of this deeply human craft.  We’ll study the history of oral history; interviewing; transcribing and editing; and the many uses of interviews—from historical research to performance to documentaries.  Students will read books, articles and review grounded in oral history; conduct their own interviews; and visit museums and archives. While our course will have a special focus on interviewing African American migrants about their journeys to northern cities and the lives they made there, students are welcome to pursue other themes in their interviews if they better fit their individual interests. In final projects, students will have a choice of writing a review essay, researching and writing a close analysis of an interview, or producing a documentary project. The American Studies Program has a limited number of digital recorders and auxiliary gear that will be made available to students.  Students from all departments, programs and schools at Rutgers are welcome to join us.

26:510:618 Seminar in Teaching History
Elizabeth Aaron
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course challenges students to investigate, reflect upon, and demonstrate exploration of current best practices in research and teaching history at the secondary level.  It is aimed at those enrolled in the Master of Arts for Teachers (MAT) program and/or those already engaged in teaching.  The goal is to guide and challenge teachers in how to integrate cutting-edge historical scholarship into their teaching.  To that end, readings and activities in graduate-level historical scholarship, modern pedagogy and educational research,  teaching methods and contemporary education issues as they relate to the teaching of history will be the focus of readings, discussion, activities, writing assignments, and assessments

**To register for the following NJIT courses, simply complete a NJIT Cross Registration form available at http://registrar.rutgers.edu/NW/NJIT-CrossRegForm2-16Apr2012.pdf and email it to history@newark.rutgers.edu.

48:510:634 Environmental History in No. America
Neil Maher
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This reading seminar provides an introduction to the field of environmental history. In it we will explore the ever changing relationship between the nature and culture of the North American continent. We will examine this history through three thematic lenses. First, we will be exploring how the natural environment shaped the patterns of human life in various parts of the continent. Second, we will be tracing the shifting ideologies towards nature held by North Americans during different periods of their nation's histories. And finally, we will be analyzing how these ideas and human activities regarding nature combined in ways that reshaped the North American landscape. Such an approach will help us better understand the transnational history of the North American continent. While we will begin the semester reading several of the so-called environmental history "classics", the goal of the course is to examine some of the newest and most innovative works in the field today.

48:510:638 Social History of Communication
Richard Sher
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course examines communication as a social and historical phenomenon, subject to variation according to time and place, yet always central to human activity. Themes will include orality and literacy; the rise of printing; the information revolution of the Enlightenment; the emergence of electric and electronic communication technologies; and specialized uses of communication such as propaganda.

Fall 2012

26:510:505 History in Fiction and Fact
James Goodman
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
History in fiction and fact juxtaposes closely related worlds of history, creative-nonfiction, biography, memoir, drama, poetry, and fiction in order to explore the past, the nature of historical understanding, and the possibilities of creative historical writing.

In this class, which is part graduate seminar and part writing workshop, we shall explore a few events and problems--and the character of historical understanding and historical writing themselves--by juxtaposing closely related works of non-fiction and fiction.  We shall start with six weeks of reading.   Our attention will be divided: On the one hand we will read for content, thinking hard about the past--about what happened and the meaning and significance of what happened.   On the other hand we will read for form, thinking about the relations between non-fiction and fiction; the similarities and differences between truth in non-fiction and truth in fiction; the ways in which writers in different genres use facts, sources, evidence, narrative, analysis, and imagination to arrive at understanding and truths; the literary dimensions of historical and other non-fiction literature and the historical and factual dimensions of fiction.   We will practice criticizing history and other non-fictions as literature and fictions as history and fact.  And then you shall set up and write about a juxtaposition of your own. 

26:510:533 Topics in American History: Immigration and American Culture and Society
Kornel Chang
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This reading intensive course provides an overview of the major historiographical issues in U.S. immigration history by integrating canonical and more recent scholarship in the field. We will therefore cover the major debates/problems (e.g. assimilation, ethnicity, citizenship) that have preoccupied practitioners in the field and see how recent trends in diasporic, transnational, and global studies have transformed the study of immigration. The goal is to begin gaining mastery over a body of literature that will give students a foundation from which to begin formulating their own research questions and agendas.

26:510:537 Problems Ancient World: Athenian Democracy
Gary Farney
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course will examine the history and development of the Classical Athenian Democracy (primarily of the fifth and fourth centuries BC). Special attention will be paid to: the origins of Greek democracy; the precise functioning of the Athenian democracy; the relationship between democracy and empire in the Greek world; and Greek intellectual opinion of democracy. We will be examining a variety of ancient sources as our primary sources (in English translation): Herodotus, Thucydides, the comedies of Aristophanes, Plato and Aristotle will be among these.

26:510:543 Topics in World History: Evolution of the Global System
Susan Carruthers
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:40 pm
Since the end of the cold war, “globalization” has been a ubiquitous buzzword—endlessly repeated, yet poorly understood and susceptible to myriad interpretations. Is it shrinking and compressing time and space, creating a “borderless world”? Is it producing a homogenous “McWorld,” or widening disparities between the global haves and have-nots, and occasioning increasingly violent forms of resistance? Or might it be simultaneously binding and fracturing communities far distant from one another?

This course takes as its starting point an understanding of “globalization” as more than simply a convenient label to denote the period since the cold war's collapse. It therefore sets out to trace the historical trajectory of a variety of globalizing processes. Topics covered include the emergence and development of a capitalist world economy; the rise and demise of colonial empires; the expansion of global trade (in commodities and human beings); connections between war and globalization; and the emergence of a “neo-liberal” order.

Readings are derived from scholars in a variety of disciplines—history, political theory, anthropology—supplemented by non-academic sources, including literature and film. The course centers, in particular, on Africa as a limit-case: both a challenge to, and corroboration of, particular ways of theorizing globalization.

Assessment will be based on weekly short responses to the readings; class participation; and a long final paper.

26:510:555 American Urban and Ethnic History
Beryl Satter
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course draws on classic and recent studies to examine key themes in the history of the post-1945 American city.   Topics covered include the rise of suburbia and the impact of this attempt to create safe and segregated living spaces on race, gender and sexuality; the history of urban renewal and public housing; the structure of "machine" politics; racial and ethnic battles over jobs, housing and urban space in the context of both prosperity and deindustrialization; the national political repercussions of these local urban battles; and the cultural politics of gentrification, "gated communities" and "global" cities. 

26:510:565 Public History: Presenting the Past: Public Histories of Slavery for the Twenty-First Century
Lyra Monteiro
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course explores the various ways in which the history of African enslavement in the New World has been remembered and interpreted in contexts ranging from historic sites and museum exhibitions to children’s literature and film, as we build towards developing proposals for new public interpretations of the history of slavery. We will use the history of African enslavement in the New World—a history that touches all of Western Europe, Western and Southern Africa, and the Americas—as a lens into the ways in which different countries and regions have publicly remembered a difficult past. Some of the issues we will explore in this class include: how the method, time, and place in which the past is narrated affect the story that can be told; the tensions between histories created for different kinds of audiences, including locals, tourists, and various descendant communities; and the ways in which the narration of slavery’s history changes over time—a topic that is particularly relevant now, as we mark the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, with an African American in the White House.

In order to address this topic, we will focus on the “primary documents” of public memory, including specific monuments, exhibitions, blogs, and plays. We will supplement this study with readings from the growing body of scholarship on the public history and public memory of slavery, coming out of disciplines including History, Archaeology, Sociology, and American Studies. As a final project, students will develop and present grant proposals for new public interpretations of the history and legacy of slavery, in a venue of their choice.

26:510:585 American History 1945-Present: America in the 1960s and 1970s (RESEARCH Seminar)
Ruth Feldstein
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This research seminar is designed with two goals in mind:

1. Graduate students will familiarize themselves with some of the subjects that concern scholars interested in the 1960s and 70s, and the methods that these scholars use to research and write about this period in U.S. history;

2.  Graduate students will develop the skills needed to write original scholarship on this period.

During the first half of the semester, we will read secondary sources intensively; topics may include sexuality, Watergate, black power, Vietnam, women’s liberation.  During the second half of the semester, students will focus on developing original independent research projects.

Through in-class workshops and small groups, we will consider how to develop research questions, how to define research topics, how to find sources, and how to work with documents.  We will also focus on how to write seminar papers in ways that that incorporate these research techniques

NOTE:  This is NOT a graduate readings seminar. It is not a comprehensive survey of the period or scholarship on the period; nor does it focus on primary sources from the era.

48:510:632 Technology, Culture, and History
Richard Sher
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10 p.m.
This course will treat the relationships between technology and culture in a variety of historical and geographical settings. It will examine the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life and the ways that technologies are adapted and exchanged by different societies. It will also consider environmental and organic factors underlying technological developments; connections between technology and concepts of time and space; technology in relation to the study of 20th-century global history; and the culture of “technological communities” – both historical and fictional.

48:510:637 Global Environmental History
Neil Maher
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 p.m.
This reading seminar provides an introduction to the field of global environmental history.  In it we will explore how human societies around the world altered, and were altered by, the natural environment.  More specifically, we will pay particular attention to the ways that political, economic, and cultural transformations throughout the world influenced these societies' relationship to, and utilization of, nature.  To do this, we will spend the semester reading material that places environmental history within transnational, global, and comparative perspectives, and which also explores not only traditional historical categories such as race, class, ethnicity, and gender but also more global themes including migration, imperialism and colonialism, the spread of epidemic diseases, international tourism, and global capitalism, among others.  Because this is an introductory course, no prior knowledge of global environmental history is necessary.

Summer 2012

26:510:516 The West, Islam, and the Middle East
Jon Cowans
Mondays, 5:00-8:30 pm (05/29/2012-08/15/2012)
This course examines the historical relationship between Europe/the West and the Islamic world of the Middle East and nearby regions from the advent of Islam to today. In examining these events, we will seek to understand the perspectives of various participants and observers and to analyze key patterns in the behavior of those involved and their perceptions of each other.

Spring 2012

26:510:504 Narrative History: "Non-Fiction Workshop"
James Goodman
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing. Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism. Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor. Permission of the instructor is required for registration.

26:510:545 19th Century Europe: Art and Politics
Eva Giloi
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
High Art – High Politics: how are the two connected? In the nineteenth century, historians claimed autonomy for art as an Idealist aesthetic realm, far above the scrimmages of political interests. Early Marxist historians argued the opposite: culture, as ‘superstructure,’ simply reflected changes in the mode of production (the economic ‘base’). More recently, historians have devised more subtle theoretical frameworks to study the intersection of seemingly neutral art and the political uses to which it is put. This course examines how recent historians have conceptualized art: how it is used by political and social actors to shore up their authority and social influence, but also how aesthetic visions can structure, direct, and limit individuals’ understanding of the world, including their place in the socio-political hierarchy. The course spans the ‘long nineteenth century’ in Europe, from the French Revolution to the fin de siècle. Focusing on France, Britain, Germany, and Austria-Hungary, it covers ‘case studies’ in painting, music, and literature to illuminate ‘the culture of power and the power of culture.’

26:510:554 Topics in American Studies: Gender in American Politics & Culture Since 1900
Tim Stewart-Winter
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course examines the history of gender in American everyday life and political culture since 1900. The syllabus is meant to develop a critical vocabulary about women, gender, and sexuality, to explore their methodological implications for history and related disciplines, and to introduce students to a wide range of classic and contemporary scholarship. This is primarily a reading course in which students will produce a historiographical essay.

26:510:585 American History, 1945-Present
Beryl Satter
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 p.m.
This course surveys histories of the U.S., 1945 to the present.  Topics covered include cultural, domestic, and racial tensions of the 1940s and 1950s; anti-Communist networks of the 1950s; the Civil Rights, New Left, Women's Liberation and Gay Liberation movements; the Vietnam War; the1970s erosion of the U.S. white working class; Puerto Rican labor migrations; the New Right; the rise of the carceral state (or “prison-industrial complex); and the culture and economics of Wall Street. 

48:510:622 Race, Culture, & Science in the History of American Medicine
Stephen Pemberton
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 p.m.
This graduate seminar in American history examines how race, culture, and science have figured prominently in American medicine and public health in the past two centuries. The particular focus will be on the health status of African-Americans in the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the persistent disparities that African-Americans have experience in health outcomes as they have engaged with American medicine and public health across the decades.

This course is appropriate for graduate students in American studies as well as history.  The subject matter and readings complement the theme of the 2012 Marion Thompson Wright Lecture Series "Taking Good Care: Health and Medicine in the Black Community," scheduled for February 18 at Rutgers, Newark.

Readings include:

Sharla Fett, Working Cures: Healing, Health, and Power on Southern Slave Plantations
James H. Jones, Bad Blood, The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment
Jonathan Metzl, The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease
Susan Reverby, Examining Tuskegee: The Infamous Syphilis Study and Its Legacy
Samuel Roberts, Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation
Rebecca Skloot, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
Marie Jenkins Schwartz, Birthing a Slave: Motherhood and Medicine in the Antebellum South
Keith Wailoo, How Cancer Crossed the Color Line
Harriet A. Washington, Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present 

48:510:638 Social History of Communication
Richard Sher
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course examines communication as a social and historical phenomenon, subject to variation according to time and place, yet always central to human activity. Themes will include orality and literacy; the rise of printing; the information revolution of the Enlightenment; the emergence of electric and electronic communication technologies; and specialized uses of communication such as propaganda.

Back to Top

Fall 2011

26:510:525 Colloquium on History of Women: Research Seminar on U.S. Women's and Gender History
Beryl Satter
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This seminar is devoted to researching and writing a substantial, footnoted research paper (approximately thirty pages in length, typed and double spaced, approximately 250 words per page) on some aspect of U.S. women's or gender history. We will spend the first few weeks reading influential historical work on U.S. women's and gender history. Class meetings will lead you through the step-by-step process of writing a research paper, including primary source research and analysis, the presentation of polished project proposals and the creation of outlines of your thesis. Some class sessions will be set aside for individual conferences, and others for group discussion.

Your research paper will be due in draft form well before the end of the seminar, so that it can go through several major revisions. Since revision is a process that is crucial to effective historical research and writing, we will devote class time to discussion of each of two drafts of your research project that you must complete a few days before the dates indicated in the syllabus below. Students will meet with the professor on an individual basis to discuss their projects and revisions and also work together on their papers, meeting in small groups with other students to discuss and critique each other's work.

26:510:532 American Diplomatic History: U.S. and Empire
Susan Carruthers
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
Can a state be both anti-colonial in its self-image and imperial in its practices? If so, how are the contradictions kept in check? Was U.S. imperialism at the turn of the nineteenth century an aberrant moment in its history, or does imperialism, in various guises, typify America 's interactions with other peoples and regions? This course explores problematic questions surrounding US/global relationships, and the character of American power—economic, military, and cultural.

America 's vexed relationship with empire has long animated historical enquiry, generating considerable debate and methodological diversity. In the wake of the U.S. occupation of Iraq , it has become the subject of much heated controversy. The course examines a rich historiographical tradition as well as some more recent excurses on the United States and empire. Temporally, works selected for study span the period from the construction of a “Republican Empire” in North America, through the 1890s—with the acquisition of territories in the Pacific and Caribbean —to the present day.

The readings have been chosen to provide students with a sense of chronological progression. However, they also represent a wide array of scholarly approaches to the study of empire, from both the humanities and social sciences, enabling us to reflect on questions such as:

*what constitutes “empire”, and what forces propel and shape it
*what distinguishes U.S. imperialism from previous/other historical empires
*the implication of race and gender in imperialism
*resistance and anti-imperialism—in the core and at the periphery

Students will be required to produce weekly discussion points, and to write two papers over the course of the semester.

26:510:543 Topics in World History: “The Ottoman Empire (1300-1922)”
Nukhet Varlik
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This seminar is devoted to a chronological and thematic study of Ottoman history from its obscure origins in early fourteenth-century Anatolia to its decline and fall in the early twentieth century. Going beyond the usual emphasis on the political and the military, we will explore the economic, legal, cultural, and scientific dimensions of one of the most neglected empires in world history.

26:510:550 Topics in Latin American History: “Wealth and Poverty in Modern Latin America”
Karen Caplan
Thursdays, 5:00-7:40 pm
This course will examine issues of inequality within Latin American nations since their independence. We will try to answer two fundamental questions. First, how and why have Latin American countries developed as places with striking gaps between the wealthy and the poor? And second, how have “poverty” and “wealth” themselves been defined, re-defined, and addressed by states, businesspeople, elites, and the poor themselves? We will address these questions in both the Latin American national and international contexts. How have nations understood and addressed their own economic and political development? How have ideology and policy influenced each other in the development of Latin American social structures, social ideas, and social policies? How has Latin America's unique place within the international economic system affected both its internal structures and its internal understandings? As an international development project has developed in the years since World War II, how has poverty become a central concern, not just within nations but for lenders, aid organizations, and activists? And how have the activities of these groups come to influence and affect Latin America itself?

26:510:555 American Urban and Ethnic History: “Race and Urban Space”
Mark Krasovic
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 pm
Reading seminar in the historical development of the urban landscape as it is affected by and, in turn, affects American racial formations. We will be guided by the interdisciplinary methods of American Studies, considering these dynamics in their cultural, political, sociological, and physical manifestations. The course begins with a consideration of some of the key theoretical contributions to the study of space and place, with particular attention to the ways in which these theories have helped establish the questions historians have asked about the role of space and place in history. We will then move both thematically and chronologically through a swath of American history, focusing on the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, studying the development of urban space as it constrains and liberates behavior, as it is fought over, and as its meaning and physical shape change over time. Writing assignments will encourage students to consider the historiography of race and space and to think of the ways that the interplay of these categories are at work in their own specific areas of interest.

26:510:570 Topics in American Legal History: “Law and Culture in American History”
Whitney Strub
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
In this research seminar, we will read notable books and articles that approach legal history through the culturally-oriented methods of American Studies. We will collectively discuss methodological aspects of these works, from sources to analytical frameworks, and students will then embark on research projects culminating in article-length papers based on original research. Primary focus will fall on the intersections of race, sexuality, and gender with law and culture, but students are encouraged to conceptualize the topic broadly in choosing their own projects.

26:510:618 Seminar in Teaching History
Elizabeth Aaron
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course allows students to investigate, reflect upon, and demonstrate current best practices in teaching history at the secondary level and to guide and challenge teachers in the best ways to integrate cutting-edge historical scholarship into their teaching. To that end, readings and activities in graduate-level historical scholarship, modern pedagogy and educational research and technology, teaching methods and contemporary issues and debates in the fields of history and education as they relate to the teaching of history will be the focus of readings, discussion, activities, writing assignments, and assessments.

48:510:632 Technology, Culture, and History
Richard Sher
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10 p.m.
This course will treat the relationships between technology and culture in a variety of historical and geographical settings. It will examine the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life and the ways that technologies are adapted and exchanged by different societies. It will also consider environmental and organic factors underlying technological developments; connections between technology and concepts of time and space; technology in relation to the study of 20th-century global history; and the culture of “technological communities” – both historical and fictional.

48:510:645 American Legal History to 1860
Gautham Rao
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 p.m.
This graduate seminar introduces students to key texts and arguments that survey the rise and function of political institutions and legal regimes in United States history from the American Revolution through the New Deal. Several relationships constitute the key themes of the course, for instance: the relationship between political ideology and political practices; legal doctrine and social forces; concepts of liberty and webs of dependence; systems of bondage and means of liberation. Other themes will cover more traditional areas of study in American political and legal history: constitutionalism, political development, the family, and the marketplace.

Back to Top

Summer 2011

26:510:560 Cities in Change II: Problems in American Urban History with Newark as its Methaphoric Center
Tom McCabe
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30-9:00 p.m. 5/31-7/8/2011
The process of urbanization as seen in the growth, decline, and revival efforts of American cities in general, but with a specific lens on Newark, NJ. Examination of the economic, political, geographical, and social factors that helped develop Newark as New Jersey's most important city and as one of the most troubled urban communities in the U.S. Attention to the origins of Newark's decline; its relationship with suburban communities in northern New Jersey; the settlement of European immigrants and rural African Americans in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries; and recent efforts to revive the city's political, economic, and cultural life.

Back to Top

Spring 2011

26:510:504 Narrative History: Creative Writing/Non-Fiction Writing Workshop
James Goodman
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
Open to history students by permission of instructor (goodmanj@andromeda.rutgers.edu)
Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing. Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism. Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor. Permission of the instructor is required for registration.

26:510:549 Topics in Latin American History: “The Making of Race in Latin America”
Karen Caplan
Thursdays, 5:00-7:40 pm
Since 1492, Latin America has been the site of intense encounters between indigenous people, people of European descent, and people of African descent. In turn, Latin Americans have developed complex and perhaps unique ways of conceiving of distinctions among and between themselves. Beginning with the pre-history of European conquest and ending in the late twentieth century, this course asks how and why such distinctions developed, and what impact they have had on politics and culture in Latin America. Many historians have argued that Latin Americans, because of the high degree of intermixture between people of different backgrounds, have developed notions of difference based less on a concept of “race” than on one of “color.” This course will examine this claim and ask what—if anything—is indeed unique about Latin American social distinctions.

Moreover, as we approach the modern period, the course will also focus on questions about Latin America and the United States. First, is it useful to compare Latin American racial constructions with those of the U.S., given their shared histories of conquest and colonial encounter? And second, we will begin to discuss what has happened when Latin Americans, as part of a massive influx of immigrants, have brought their racial ideas and experiences to the U.S. with them.

26:510:551 American Intellectual and Cultural History: “Race and Racism in the Americas”
Kornel Chang
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This graduate course examines the historical development of race and racism in the Americas, seeking to understand the complex ways race has operated in the hemisphere, with a focus on the United States. We will explore how race has shifted and changed over time, its internal tensions and contradictions, and the political and cultural work it has performed in the past. In doing so, the course will focus on the ways race was created alongside and in relation to other social formations including class, nation, gender, and sexuality.

26:510:553 American Political and Legal History: “Race and Sexual Politics in the United States”
Timothy Stewart-Winter
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course surveys the history of race and sexuality as important and intersecting categories that organize life and politics in the United States since the early twentieth century. The focus will be on the development of racial and sexual classifications, their place in American culture, and how Americans embraced, resisted, and transformed their normative meanings. The course is organized both chronologically and thematically, spanning the period between the turn of the twentieth century—an era when millions of African Americans moved from the rural South to Northern cities, and an expanding world of commercial entertainment allowed some city-dwellers to experiment with new configurations of sex and gender—and the present.

26:510:565 Public History
Clement A. Price
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This course explores the presentation of historical information and narratives in venues and media platforms that fall within the realm of public history. It contextualizes challenges that are often faced by public historians and other publicly oriented scholars at work in non-academic places where the past is often contested. The course also sheds light on public history debates and transformations on the national and local level, including the emerging consensus on the interpretation of slavery on former southern plantations, the now famous controversy over the Smithsonian Institution's plans for an exhibition on the mission of the Enola Gay, the controversy over the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C., and Newark, New Jersey's fortieth anniversary commemoration of the civil unrest of 1967, among other examples of contested commemorative events. In short, the course explores various public intersections of memory, scholarship, and public discourse involving professionally trained historians within the public sphere. The course also reflects the professor's interest in encouraging graduate students in history and American Studies to consider the public realm for professional career opportunities.

26:510:583 Problems and Readings in American History 1912-1945
Beryl Satter
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 pm
The first half of the twentieth century witnessed dramatic shifts in U.S. racial ideologies, gender relations, patterns of sexuality, and patterns of labor. It also witnessed two major periods of political reform (the Progressive Era, 1890-1920, and the New Deal, 1933-38). In order to understand how historians have interpreted these changes, we will read political, intellectual, labor, and narrative histories; women's history; histories of racial ideologies and sexual ideologies; and histories of immigration and of early twentieth-century U.S. imperialism.

26:510:585 American Studies and Popular Culture: Research Seminar
Ruth Feldstein
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 pm
This research seminar will focus on how and why scholars of American Studies have engaged with popular culture. We will spend the first half of the semester reading range of interdisciplinary scholarship that draws in various ways on aspects of popular culture. In the second half of the semester, students will focus more on primary research and the writing (and rewriting) of seminar papers.

48:510:635 - History of Technology, Environment and Medicine: Theory and Method
Neil Maher
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00 p.m.
This readings course will focus on the technological, environmental, and medical history of the post-World War II era. In an effort to place this history within its broader cultural context, the semester's readings will include works that explore this period in both the United States and beyond its borders. The semester will begin with a four-week introduction to the three fields under consideration - the history of technology, environmental history, and the history of medicine and health. We will then spend the rest of the semester reading innovative works that attempt to bridge these three historical methodologies. All of these readings will engage historical categories such as race, class, gender, consumption, politics, and the human body in an effort to better understand the numerous social movements of this period, from Civil Rights and the women's movement to environmentalism, the counterculture, and the rise of conservatism. Finally, the class will examine several theoretical approaches used to conceptualize this complex relationship between the history of technology, environmental history, and the history of medicine and health during the postwar era.

48:510:656 - Topics in the History of Health: Medicine and Health Law in Twentieth Century America
Stephen Pemberton
Thursdays, 6:00-9:00 p.m.
This course examines the legal, social, and ethical aspects of medical and public health practice in the United States from 1900 to the present – with particular focus on the second half of the twentieth century. Topics include the rights and responsibilities of physicians and patients, the roles of government in promoting health, the rise of health law and bioethics, the tensions between civil liberties and public health, as well as evolving notions of harm, liability, uncertainty, and proof as they relate to the histories of medical and public health practice.

Readings will include, but are not limited to:

Allan Brandt, The Cigarette Century: The Rise, Fall, and Deadly Persistence of a Product that Defined America (Basic Books, 2007). ISBN: 0465070485
Lynne Curry, The Human Body on Trial: A Handbook with Cases, Laws, and Documents (Hackett Publishing Co., 2004). ISBN: 0872207382
Peter Filene, In the Arms of Others: A Cultural History of the Right-to-Die in America (Ivan R. Dee Publishers, 1999)
Judith Walzer Leavitt, Typhoid Mary: Captive to the Public's Health (Beacon Press, 1996)
David Rothman, Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision-Making (Basic Books, 1991).
M. L. Tina Stevens, Bioethics in America: Origins and Cultural Politics (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000).
Rebecca Skloot, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (Crown Publishers, 2010). ISBN: 1400052173

Additional readings will touch on compulsory vaccination, contraception and abortion, privacy and disease surveillance, and other seminal subjects of relevance to public health, medicine, and the law in America.

Back to Top

Fall 2010

26: 510:533   TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY: “Immigration & American Culture & Society”
Kornel Chang
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course offers an introduction to the historiography of immigration to the United States, examining how thinking and assessments of the immigrant and the immigration process has changed over time. We will pay particular attention to how recent developments in diasporic, transnational, and global studies have transformed the field of study.

26: 510:534   TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY: “Sexuality and American Culture”
Whitney Strub
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course examines sexuality, culture, and the ways they have interacted as both reflections and constitutive elements of social power in the United States. Our readings will proceed chronologically, from the colonial period through the twenty-first century, and our discussions will also be methodological in nature, focusing on the techniques through which cultural historians and historians of sexuality have approached these issues in their work. As a reading seminar, assignments will come in the form of historiographical essays and analytical book reviews.

26: 510:543   TOPICS IN WORLD HISTORY : “A History of Indic Civilizations: Connected Histories of the Silk Road and Indian Ocean”
Amita Satyal
Mondays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course examines the shifting boundaries and meanings of ‘region', ‘civilization', and ‘global' taking a long view and an Indic perspective on the intensifying connections of distant cultures and economies across two distinct phases, the precolonial and colonial. To that end, the course will focus on the history of the interconnectedness of the ‘Silk Road' and ‘Indian Ocean' and explore their vital role in the construction and reconfiguration of the Indic world that was closely bound by commerce, mobility, religious practices, art forms and social and political structures. We will discuss the economic, political, social and cultural factors underlying these complex processes, and interrogate how and why did change occur over these two phases. Evidently, the ‘Silk Road' and ‘Indian Ocean' - on account of their historically fluid, transregional and crosscultural character - are appropriate rubrics for this course that encourages stepping out of existing geographies and chronologies and aims to reflect upon the histories of movement and exchange of peoples, ideas and goods as not only complex and asymmetric, but also closely bound with evolving hierarchies of power and forms of control.

26:510:545 NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE: “History from Below”
Eva Giloi
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course examines nineteenth century European history from below: i.e., from the perspective of marginal groups, their social practices and everyday life, which usually leave only few, hard-to-discern historical traces behind. The course explores the creative methodologies historians use to excavate the elusive experiences of non-dominant, subaltern groups and individuals. Topics may include: the daily life of dominated groups (working classes, women, colonial subjects); the experience of childhood and adolescence; submerged acts of resistance by the overtly powerless; audience reception of official propaganda; etc. Where appropriate, the course also looks to US history for methodological inspiration.

26:510:549 TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: “Popular Politics and Revolution in Latin American and Caribbean History”
Joaquin M. Chavez
Mondays, 5:00-7:40 pm
This class examines popular politics, insurgency, and revolution in colonial and modern Latin America and the Caribbean. It centers on the historical role of peasants, popular intellectuals, and workers from indigenous, African-American, and ethnically mixed backgrounds in their relations with elites and the state in different regional contexts.

During the course of the semester, students will gain specialized knowledge on the history of Latin America and the Caribbean. Students will deconstruct historical narratives by examining the historians’ theoretical approaches, arguments, and empirical reconstruction of events. At the end of this course, students will be able to clearly identify major arguments pertaining crucial events and processes in Latin American and Caribbean history (i.e. slave and indigenous rebellions, wars of Independence, and social revolutions) and to hold informed opinions about them.

26: 510:551 AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY: “Introduction to American Studies”
Ruth Feldstein
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This class offers an intellectual mapping of American Studies as a field, with a consideration of where the field has been, where it is going, and the issues with which scholars of American Studies are currently engaged.

26:510:552 AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY
Robert Snyder
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course is a research seminar. Students will read selected books in cultural history of greater New York since the 1890s and then research and write essays grounded in primary sources. Our subject is greater New York; students are welcome to look at topics grounded anywhere in the metropolitan area, from Manhattan to the city's other boroughs and its suburbs. Research in all subjects and time periods is welcomed. We will devote sustained attention to the craft of research and to planning, writing and revising an essay. This is a valuable course for both students who are new to research and for students who are experienced researchers who want to pursue a subject in the history of greater New York since the 1890s.

26:510:618 SEMINAR IN TEACHING HISTORY
*NOTE: Students that have previously enrolled in the Seminar may enroll.*
Elizabeth Aaron
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course is designed to allow students to work on further developing their own critical reading, writing, and analytical skills as well as teaching skills as they pertain to teaching history at the high school level. In the seminar's early weeks, students will choose an historical event or era to use as the focus of their culminating project, a curriculum-based project that incorporates both historical scholarship and pedagogy centered around current thinking on best practices in both areas. Readings will be teacher- and student-selected and include recent books on historical topics, periodicals, books and articles related to teaching methods and current research in teaching and learning. Prior completion of Seminar In Teaching History is recommended but not required.

48:510:632 TECHNOLOGY, CULTURE AND HISTORY
Gautham Rao
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
The history of law and political authority in the making of modern America. Introduces students to central themes and seminal works in the history of regulation, constitutionalism, and governance from colonial times to the present. Topics covered include: The Crisis of Authority in Colonial America, 1700-1763; Revolution and Counterrevolution, 1763-1789; The Legal Foundations of Capitalism, 1816-1860; The Legal Foundations of Slavery, 1800-1860; The Progressive Era: Laboratory of Legal Modernity, 1900-1933; The New Deal and the Administrative State, 1933-1950; The Cold War and the Globalization of Legal and Political Thought, 1950-1973; Repressive Regulation: Policing Modern Sexuality, 1945-1980; Citizenship: Inclusion and Exclusion, 1945-1973.; Deregulation and the Deconstruction of the New Deal Order, 1973-1989; The Ideological Reconstruction of American Law, 1989-2008.

48:510:638 SOCIAL HISTORY OF COMMUNICATION
Richard Sher
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course examines communication as a social and historical phenomenon, subject to variation according to time and place, yet always central to human activity. Themes will include orality and literacy; the rise of printing; the information revolution of the Enlightenment; the emergence of electric and electronic communication technologies; and specialized uses of communication such as propaganda.

Back to Top

Summer 2010

26:510:534:H6 TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY: "Cities and Suburbs in American History"
Thomas McCabe
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:00 PM, 447 Conklin Hall
07/12/10-08/18/10
Over the course of the twentieth century, the United States was transformed from an urban nation to a predominantly suburban one. This course will examine the social, cultural, economic, and spatial changes that resulted in both the “urban crisis” and the formation of a “suburban nation.” Among other themes, the readings probe the intersection of race, class, neighborhood, consumer culture, and public policies in the fast-growing field of metropolitan history.

26:510:590:B6 Problems and Readings in African History: Aspects of African Response to European Rule
Said Samatar
Mondays and Wednesdays, 5:00 p.m., 324 Conklin Hall
06/1/10-07/8/10
This seminar deals with the phenomenon known as the “European Scramble for Africa”—conquest, consequent colonization and the rise of mass nationalist movements whose resistance struggles resulted in the final ejection of Europe from Africa.   In particular, this part deals with “Response Issues”: 1. flight 2. collaboration 3. Resistance 4. Diplomatic maneuverings  

Spring 2010

26:510:506 POETICS OF HISTORY: Creative Writing/Non-Fiction Writing Workshop
Jim Goodman
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10 PM
Open to history students by permission of instructor (goodmanj@andromeda.rutgers.edu)
Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing.    Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism.    Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor. Permission of the instructor is required for registration.

26:510:521 Topics in South Asian History : History of Ideas in Ancient Religions, 600 BCE-100 CE
Amita Satyal
Wednesdays, 5:30pm-8:10pm
This course examines the development of ideas around ethics and enlightenment in the Shramana or Ascetic movements that peaked around 600 BCE in India. The Upanishads followed by the early Buddhist tradition, or the Theravada Pali Canon as they came to be called, were a significant part of the shramana movements that questioned the authority of Brahmanism and enunciated a fresh goal, namely salvation or enlightenment, which was not only closely connected to reincarnation (samsara), but also ethics (sila), in fact, almost predicated upon the latter. In this course, although we will focus on early Buddhism, yet we will start with a close and selective reading of the chief Upanishadic texts before we read commentaries on the relevant Buddhist texts of the Pali Canon (Tripitaka). Some of the questions that we will ask are: Why did the shramana movements, already active since the Indus Valley Civilization, peak at the time they did? In terms of ideas, what were their most distinctive contributions and differences? What was 'ascetic' about the Buddhist tradition even as it endorsed wealth and economic activity? What was the nature of the link drawn between ethics and enlightenment? And, finally, where was mental culture located in the complex of spiritual life, wisdom and liberation?

26: 510:532   American Diplomatic History : “Media and American War Experience, 1898-2009: Research Seminar”
Susan Carruthers
Tuesdays, 5:00-7:40pm
Since the birth of modern communication technologies in the late nineteenth century, war has been a staple of newsreels and motion pictures, newspaper columns and radio broadcasts. War, it is often said, sells. But war must also be sold, and the role mass media play in mobilizing support for particular engagements has never been free from controversy. Are the media too much part of an official “war machine” or insufficiently so? If opinion “wins wars,” as Eisenhower claimed during World War II, can it also lose them? And how far are media responsible for shaping individual and collective opinions?

Highly topical today, such questions have a long historical trajectory. Casting back to the Spanish-American-Cuban War of 1898, arguably the first US “media war,” this course will focus on a number of enduring themes: censorship and control; photography and perception; the war correspondent; Hollywood and the military.

This class is organized as a research seminar with a significant emphasis on acquiring research skills and working closely with primary sources, printed and visual. Assigned readings will provide a scholarly context for these investigations. But independent research will be a crucial component of this seminar as students work to produce a paper based primarily on archival findings: a scholarly project undertaken in supportive dialog with classmates and the instructor.

 26:510:546 EUR HIST SINCE 1850: “20th Century Europe”
Jon Cowans
Tuesdays, 5:00-7:40pm
This course examines a series of significant moments and issues in Europe's twentieth-century history, including the World Wars; political and economic reactions to the Depression; the Spanish Civil War; postwar reconstruction and the development of the welfare state; youth culture, rock music, and protest movements of the 1960s; the conservative backlash in Thatcher's Britain and elsewhere; decolonization and its impact on Europe, including immigration of non-European peoples; and the collapse of communism. Using a combination of primary and secondary sources, the course examines a range of historical subfields, from cultural and intellectual to social and economic history.
 
26:510:595 “Social History of American Medicine since 1800 ”
Stephen Pemberton
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm (NJIT)
This course provides an overview of the social history of medicine in the United States from the era of the early republic to the late twentieth century. The readings and discussions will utilize the histories of medicine, health and disease as a window onto a changing American society. Of particular focus will be the enduring roles of class, race, and gender. We will see, for instance, how medical and health issues reflect and illuminate matters of class, race and gender in America, how social movements have impacted efforts to promote health (including Jacksonian populism, 19th-century evangelical Protestantism, women's suffrage, and Civil Rights), how industrialism, big business, and consumerism have influenced medical and public health practice, and how the federal government has invested in medicine and health and developed health care policy.    Topics also include the emergence of the medical profession; the relations between medical concepts, therapies, and mainstream social thought; the character of regular and alternative healing movements; the social context of medical innovation, experimentation, and progress; the social history of hospitals and other medical institutions; changing medical responses to infectious and chronic disease; as well as debates about health care in the United States.

26: 510:597 “Technology, Culture and History”
Richard Sher
Wednesdays, 5:00-7:40pm (NJIT)
This course will treat the relationships between technology and culture in a variety of historical and geographical settings. It will examine the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life and the ways that technologies are adapted and exchanged by different societies. It will also consider environmental and organic factors underlying technological developments; connections between technology and concepts of time and space; technology in relation to the study of 20th-century global history; and the culture of “technological communities” – both historical and fictional.

26:510:549   “Topics in Latin American  History: Latin America and the World”
Karen Caplan
Mondays, 5:00-7:40pm
In this course, we will investigate the multifaceted relationship between Latin American places, nations, and people and the rest of the world. How has that relationship shaped Latin America, and how has Latin America shaped global history? Beginning with the colonial era and bringing the story up to the present, we will ask how the culture, politics, and economics of Latin American society fit into a global narrative. We will at times ask very specific questions about particular kinds of relationships—between Spain and its American colonies, between the United States and Latin America, or between Latin American nations and their neighbors.   But will also constantly be exploring how we might build a narrative of Latin American history that is both globally informed and that informs the global. This involves defining and interrogating concepts like “influence,” “exploitation,” “imperialism,” and “cooperation.”  

26:510:585 AM HIST 1945-PRESENT: “America in the 1960s and 1970s: Research Seminar”
Ruth Feldstein
Mondays, 6:00pm-8:40pm
This research seminar is designed to familiarize graduate students with both the content and the methods that scholars from various disciplines use to research and write about the 1960s and 70s in the United States, and to develop the skills needed to write original scholarship on this period.   During the first half of the semester, students will read intensively; the goal will be to consider the topics and themes that writers interested in these decades emphasize, as well as the range of methods and approaches that American Studies as a field draws on in scholarship on this period.   During the second half of the semester, students will develop original research projects on topics of their choice.   Required readings will be shorter and more focused, as students work more independently on researching and writing.   Through in-class workshops and small groups, we will consider how to develop research questions, how to define research topics, how to find sources, and how to work with documents.   We will also focus on how to write in ways that that incorporate these research techniques. At the end of the semester, students will have learned what it means to do a major research paper that draws on both primary and secondary sources, and will also be more familiar with relevant resources in the Newark area.

26:510:618   SEMINAR IN TEACHING HISTORY (For MAT students)
Elizabeth Aaron
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10pm
This course allows students to investigate, reflect upon, and demonstrate current best practices in teaching history at the secondary level. It is aimed at those enrolled in the Master of Arts for Teachers (MAT) program and/or those already engaged in teaching. The goal is to guide and challenge teachers in how to integrate cutting-edge historical scholarship into their teaching. To that end, readings and activities in graduate-level historical scholarship, modern pedagogy and educational research, teaching methods and contemporary education issues as they relate to the teaching of history will be the focus of readings, discussion, activities, writing assignments, and assessments.

Fall 2009

26:510:505 History in Fiction and Fact
Wednesdays 5-7:40 p.m.; Conklin Hall, 338
Jim Goodman
History in fiction and fact juxtaposes closely related worlds of history, biography, memoir, and fiction in order to explore the past, the nature of historical understanding, and the possibilities of creative historical writing.

In this class, which is part graduate seminar and part history writing workshop, we shall explore a few historical events and problems--and the character of historical understanding and historical writing themselves--by juxtaposing closely related works of history, biography, memoir, and fiction. We shall start with six weeks of reading.   Our attention will be divided: On the one hand we will read for content, thinking hard about the past--about what happened and the meaning and significance of what happened.   On the other hand we will read for form, thinking about the relations between history and fiction; the similarities and differences between truth in history and truth in fiction; the ways in which historians and novelists use facts, sources, evidence, narrative, analysis, and imagination to arrive at historical understanding and truths; the literary dimensions of historical literature and the historical dimension of fiction.   We will practice criticizing history as literature and fiction as history. And then you shall set up and write about a juxtaposition of your own.  

26:510:526 Readings in Afro-American History: "Slavery and Reconstruction"
Tuesdays 5:00-7:40 p.m.; 324 Conklin Hall
Clement Price
This course is informed by two pivotally important and interconnected chapters in African American historical scholarship and memory—the enslavement of Africans on American soil over the years immediately leading up to the Civil War and the Great Emancipation, and the Era of Reconstruction, when freedmen, freedwomen and their children sought to carve out spaces, pathways and organizations, both private and public, that would give meaning to their aspirations and their culture and to the emerging complexity of their modern lives. During that time, as the course will reveal, many African Americans engaged, as best they could, the larger society on terms they found honorable and fulfilling. Drawing from an array of essential readings on these poignant narratives of exploitation, survival, hope, agency, transformation and, alas, setback, the course will shed light on what was arguably the nation's most difficult encounter with what its past and its turbulent present had wrought at that time.

26:510:533 Topics in American History : "History of American Conservatism"
Thursdays, 5:00-7:40 PM; 307 Cullimore Hall (NJIT)
Allison Perlman
This course will examine the emergence and ascent of postwar American conservatism. Drawing on classic works and contemporary studies, this course will chart the rise of conservatism as a political ideology, social movement, and set of intellectual and cultural beliefs. We will identify the myriad groups who have been labeled conservative – for example, neoconservatives, economic libertarians, social traditionalists, the religious right – and explore how their competing and often contradictory views have cohered under the umbrella of “conservatism.” In addition, this course will investigate how the rise of the right has intersected with key events in postwar American history, including the cold war and McCarthyism; 1960s countercultural and youth movements; civil rights activism and debates over affirmative action; the rise of second wave feminism and the expansion of reproductive rights; white flight, the growth of the suburbs, and the transformation of the American city; and the culture wars targeting the academy and the media. As such, this course will interrogate postwar conservatism's growth not only with respect to American political and intellectual history, but also in relation to the history of gender, race, class, sexuality, place, and religion.

26:510:547 Comparative World Colonialism
Thursdays 5:00-7:40 p.m.; 324 Conklin Hall
Jon Cowans
This seminar will examine the interactions of Europeans and non-Europeans after 1500. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analysis of the colonial experience in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

26:510:549 Topics in Latin American History : “Wealth and Poverty in Modern Latin America”
Mondays 5:00-7:40 p.m.; 324 Conklin Hall
Karen Caplan
This course will examine issues of inequality within Latin American nations since their independence. We will try to answer two fundamental questions. First, how and why have Latin American countries developed as places with striking gaps between the wealthy and the poor? And second, how have “poverty” and “wealth” themselves been defined, re-defined, and addressed by states, businesspeople, elites, and the poor themselves? We will address these questions in both the Latin American national and international contexts. How have nations understood and addressed their own economic and political development? How have ideology and policy influenced each other in the development of Latin American social structures, social ideas, and social policies? How has Latin America's unique place within the international economic system affected both its internal structures and its internal understandings? As an international development project has developed in the years since World War II, how has poverty become a central concern, not just within nations but for lenders, aid organizations, NGOs, and activists? And how have the activities of these groups come to influence and affect Latin America itself?

26:510:551 American Intellectual and Cultural History : “Introduction to American Studies”
Mondays 6:00-9:00 p.m.; 348 Conklin Hall
Ruth Feldstein
This class offers an intellectual mapping of American Studies as a field, with a consideration of where the field has been, where it is going, and the issues with which scholars of American Studies are currently engaged.

26:510:567 Global Envrionmental History
Wednesdays 5:00-7:40 p.m.; 324 Engelhard Hall
Neil Maher
This course takes a global view of human interactions with the natural world, mixing broad themes such as colonialism and industrialization with detailed case studies in an effort to understand the complicated ways that people and the environment have mutually shaped one another in different places and at different times. Because environmental change often transcends national boundaries, this course places important subjects in environmental history such as disease, agriculture, pollution, and environmentalism into a global and transnational context.

26:510:618 Seminar in Teaching History
Tuesdays 5:30-8:10 p.m.; 215 Engelhard Hall
Elizabeth Meola Aaron
This course allows students to investigate, reflect upon, and demonstrate current best practices in teaching history at the secondary level. It is aimed at those enrolled in the Master of Arts for Teachers (MAT) program and/or those already engaged in teaching. The goal is to guide and challenge teachers in how to integrate cutting-edge historical scholarship into their teaching. To that end, readings and activities in graduate-level historical scholarship, modern pedagogy and educational research, teaching methods and contemporary education issues as they relate to the teaching of history will be the focus of readings, discussion, activities, writing assignments, and assessments.

Summer 2009

26:510:546: Problems & Readings in European History since 1850: 20th Century Europe
Mondays, 5:00 p.m., 324 Conklin Hall (5/26-8/12/2009)
Jon Cowans
This course examines a series of significant moments and issues in Europe's twentieth-century history, including the World Wars; political and economic reactions to the Depression; the Spanish Civil War; postwar reconstruction and the development of the welfare state; youth culture, rock music, and protest movements of the 1960s; the conservative backlash in Thatcher's Britain and elsewhere; decolonization and its impact on Europe, including immigration of non-European peoples; and the collapse of communism. Using a combination of primary and secondary sources, the course examines a range of historical subfields, from cultural and intellectual to social and economic history.

26:510:590: Problems and Readings in African History: Aspects of African Response to European Rule
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:00 p.m., 324 Conklin Hall (5/26-7/2/2009)
Said Samatar
This seminar deals with the phenomenon known as the “European Scramble for Africa”—conquest, consequent colonization and the rise of mass nationalist movements whose resistance struggles resulted in the final ejection of Europe from Africa.   In particular, this part deals with “Response Issues”: 1. flight 2. collaboration 3. Resistance 4. Diplomatic maneuverings  

Spring 2009

26:510:537 PROBLEMS IN ANCIENT WORLD: ANCIENT HISTORIANS & HISTORIOGRAPHY
Wednesdays, 5:30-8:10 PM; 338 Conklin Hall
Gary Farney
This course will examine the process of writing history in the Greek and Roman worlds, and the value of the works of ancient historians for studying Greek and Roman history. We will read a wide variety of history in its sub-genres (annalistic, ethnography, geography, biography and contemporary history) and historians in the course of the class, including Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenpohon, Polybius, Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, Suetonius, Plutarch, Ammianus Marcellinus and Procopius. We will also read a large selection of modern secondary literature about ancient historiography.

26:510:554 AMERICAN POLITICAL& LEGAL HISTORY: POLITICS, SOCIAL LIFE & LAW IN JEFFERSONIAN AMERICA
Mondays, 5:30-8:10 PM; 324 Conklin Hall
Annette Gordon-Reed
This seminar will explore the development of the political, legal, and economic system in the Early American Republic, highlighting the struggles over development in each of these areas. We will cover the debate over adopting the Constitution, the struggle between Jefferson and Hamilton, the development of political parties, and the beginning of westward expansion. We will also explore how slavery and regionalism contributed to the looming sectional crisis that would destroy, and then, transform the Union. Attention will be paid to the role of women during this time and the transformation of the American family.

26:510:568 TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY: RESEARCH SEMINAR
Wednesdays 5:00-7:40 p.m.; 324 Conklin Hall
Neil Maher
In this research seminar in environmental history students will complete an article-length essay (25-30 pages in length, with notes), based on original research. This course will be a workshop where students are engaged in their own independent projects but share common concerns regarding historical methodology. The most important objective for the seminar is for students to develop skills as researchers and writers to prepare them for writing their thesis or masters essay. The semester will be divided into two parts. During the first few weeks of the semester, we will familiarize ourselves with several different methodologies undertaken by environmental historians, and also examine various techniques and strategies that historians from all fields use to locate and organize their source materials. During the second half of the semester, students will share their writing with one another in an effort to improve drafts before submitting a final paper. Prior knowledge of the field of environmental history is suggested but not necessary.

26:510:571 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL METHOD: CULTURE AND POWER
Tuesdays 5:00-7:40 p.m.; 324 Conklin Hall
Eva Giloi
This course introduces students to prominent trends in historiography in the past few decades. It focuses on what has been called “the new cultural history,” and specifically the intersection of culture and power. Students will read and discuss works by social theorists and historians, and will consider the methodological implications of these different theoretical approaches. Topics include the Marxist origins of cultural criticism; anthropological and Foucauldian alternatives; theories of cultural reproduction and resistance. The seminar will give students an understanding of the dominant conceptual terms of present-day historiography, including hegemony, discourse, orientalism, microhistory, ‘deep play,' the public sphere, cultural capital, cultural poaching, and the techniques of domination and resistance. The seminar thus aims to help students place historical works in the context of recent theoretical debates about the nature and origin of power. It is aimed equally at masters students interested in continuing in a PhD program in history, and students more generally interested in the latest theories in cultural history.

26:510:593 CULTURE& SCIENCE IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN MEDICINE: AIDS IN AMERICA
Mondays, 5:00-7:40 p.m.; 307 Cullimore Hall (NJIT)
Stephen Pemberton
This seminar introduces how historians and other historical thinkers have explored disease and health to understand the complex relationships between medicine, science and culture in American society. To achieve this end, we will focus on historical accounts and understandings of the AIDS epidemic in the United States as well as how the U.S. has involved itself in the global effort to combat HIV-AIDS. Of particular concern will be the extent to which the expert cultures of biomedicine and public health mirror and inform American society and popular culture. Our readings will allow students to link interactions between medicine, science and culture to the changing moral and political economies of health and to analyze the roles of science and technology in medicine and the roles of private enterprise, voluntary associations, and government in managing health. The historical relation between AIDS and other disease problems will also be emphasized particularly as they relate to various ideas about the body, self, and group identity. Cancer, tuberculosis, polio, and hemophilia are among these other disease problems. Finally, students will investigate how issues of class, race, gender and sexuality have informed American responses to AIDS.

26:510:618 SEMINAR IN TEACHING HISTORY ( for mat students )
Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 p.m.; 424 Conklin Hall
Elizabeth Aaron
This course allows students to investigate and reflect upon best practices in teaching history at the secondary level.  It is aimed at those enrolled in the Master of Arts for Teachers (MAT) program and/or those already engaged in teaching. The goal is to guide and challenge teachers in how to integrate current and cutting-edge historical scholarship into their teaching. To that end, readings and activities in both graduate-level historical scholarship and teaching methods will be the focus of reading, discussion, writing assignments, and assessment.

26:478:572 EVOLUTION OF THE GLOBAL SYSTEM
Tuesdays, 6:00-8:40 PM; 392 Center for Law and Justice
Susan Carruthers
Since the end of the cold war, “globalization” has been a ubiquitous buzzword—endlessly repeated, yet poorly understood and susceptible to myriad interpretations. Is it shrinking and compressing time and space, creating a “borderless world”? Is it producing a homogenous “McWorld”, or widening economic disparities between the global haves and have-nots, and occasioning increasingly violent forms of resistance (of which terrorism may be one)? Or might it be simultaneously binding and fracturing communities far distant from one another?

This course takes as its starting point an understanding of “globalization” as more than simply a convenient label to denote the period since the cold war's collapse. It therefore sets out to trace the historical trajectory of a variety of globalizing processes, and the evolution of various forms of “globalism”—as embodied in international regimes, organizations, and social and cultural movements. Topics covered will include the development of Empire; the expansion of global trade (in commodities and human beings); the emergence of the states-system; connections between war and globalization; and the current operations of the “neo-liberal” order (in both its economic and political forms, including the recent emergence of a human rights-inflected challenge to norms of state sovereignty).

In sum, the course seeks to consider:

* a variety of ways of conceiving and theorizing “the global”
* the changing character, and degree of globality, of this system (or these systems)
* forms of resistance to it/them

Fall 2008

26:510:506   POETICS OF HISTORY: CREATIVE WRTING/NON-FICTION
Mondays, 5:00-8:10 PM
James Goodman
(Open to history student by instructor permission only; goodmanj@andromeda.rutgers.edu)
Non-Fiction Writing Workshop: Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing.   Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism.   Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor.   Permission of the instructor is required for registration.

26:510:526   PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY
Thursdays, 5:00-7:40 PM
Clement Price
“I have tracked my bleeding countrymen through the widely scattered documents of American history; I have listened to their groans, their clanking chains, and melting prayers, until the woes of a race and the agonies of centuries seem to crowd upon my soul as a bitter reality. Many pages of this history have been blistered with my tears; and, although having lived but a little more than a generation, my mind feels as if it were cycles old.” So wrote George Washington Williams in the preface of his 1884 tour de force, History of the Negro Race in America, 1619-1880. Williams, one of the founders of the Negro History Movement, could not have known at the time that the efforts of his and succeeding generations of historians in the field would ultimately change the larger story of the United States and that the consensus view of American life would ultimately become discredited by the 1960s. This course will examine contemporary issues in African American historical scholarship, including race, class, gender, sexuality, and popular culture from the late 19th century to the modern civil rights movement. It will explore as well the oppositional, or protest, sensibilities of modern black life, the significance of the Great Migration to northern and southern black communities and the influence of recent African American historical scholarship on the study of race and whiteness.

26:510:531   American Diplomatic History: “Culture and the Cold War”
Mondays, 5:00-7:40 PM
Susan Carruthers
We associate early cold war America with red scares, black lists, and atomic anxiety: a paranoid society in which children were taught to "duck and cover," while Dr. Strangelove learnt how to stop worrying and love the bomb. But how and why did these phenomena become the markers of a distinctive "cold war culture"?   Was there, indeed, such a thing?   And how did "ordinary Americans" understand the character of an ideological struggle at once global and local?

Focusing predominantly on the period from the late 1940s to the early 1960s, this course will explore the cultural contours of the cold war from multiple vantage points.   Although we'll devote considerable time to pondering cold war culture within the United States, the syllabus is designed to "transnationalize" our understandings of this phenomenon.   Readings will therefore examine how cultural assumptions of Otherness shaped notions of enmity and identity during the cold war, and how cultural exchange played a role in this global war of ideas.   Where possible, we'll examine how those on the far side of the "iron curtain" perceived the contest between communism and capitalism; how they responded to western cultural imports, and generated their own antidotes or adaptations.

The syllabus will encompass scholarly works drawn from a range of different disciplines (history; cultural theory; film studies; and international relations).   However, the class will also require students to engage in hands-on analysis of primary sources, including movies, novels, and other cultural artifacts of the era.   So, come prepared!

26:510:543 TOPICS IN WORLD HISTORY:   EVOLUTION OF THE GLOBAL SYSTEM
Thursdays, 5:00-7:40 PM
Richard Langhorne
The aim of this course is to give students a good basis of knowledge and analysis of the evolution of the global political and economic system over time, and how the processes and consequences of globalization are affecting it in the contemporary world. Included in the course will be an introduction to the use of electronic global information sources so that students can gain some actual experience of it in preparing their second class paper and be able to use that knowledge for other purposes later. Students will first be required to write one paper, to be delivered by 17 November, on a topic relevant to the main part of the course. The exact topic should be discussed first with Professor Langhorne. Using as many electronic sources of knowledge as possible, each student will then produce a case study of a current global issue, the topic to be agreed with Professor Langhorne and Mr. Au. These studies must be delivered by 10 December. Grades will be given on the basis of performance in both pieces of writing.

26:510:544 Caribbean History: Slavery, Revolution, and Emancipation
Thursdays, 5:00-7:40 PM
Sara Fanning
The Caribbean throughout the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries became the site of competition between European powers vying for control of the fertile islands of the archipelago. The course will explore the motives and methods of the main players, the Spanish, French, and British, each of whom controlled numerous islands. Topics include the impact of the Columbian conquest, the Caribbean as breeding ground for the buccaneer, the rise and fall of slavery, and labor systems established for sugar and coffee planting. When millions of African slaves were imported to work these plantations, they became the majority of the Caribbean population. Their stories of enslavement, resistance, and revolution will be a central feature of the course.

26:510:548 Environmental History of North America
Wednesdays 5:00-7:40 p.m.
Neil Maher
This reading seminar provides an introduction to the field of environmental history. In it we will explore the ever changing relationship between the nature and culture of the North American continent. We will examine this history through three thematic lenses. First, we will be exploring how the natural environment shaped the patterns of human life in various parts of the continent. Second, we will be tracing the shifting ideologies towards nature held by North Americans during different periods of their nation's histories. And finally, we will be analyzing how these ideas and human activities regarding nature combined in ways that reshaped the North American landscape. Such an approach will help us better understand the transnational history of the North American continent. While we will begin the semester reading several of the so-called environmental history "classics", the goal of the course is to examine some of the newest and most innovative works in the field today.

26:510:551 AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL & CULTURAL HISTORY: INTRO TO AMERICAN STUDIES
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00 PM
Ruth Feldstein
This class offers an intellectual mapping of American Studies as a field, with a consideration of where the field has been, where it is going, and the issues with which scholars of American Studies are currently engaged.

26:510:555 AMERICAN URBAN AND ETHNIC HISTORY
Wednesdays, 5:00-7:40 PM
Beryl Satter
This course draws on classic and recent studies to examine key themes in the history of the post-1945 American city. Topics covered include the rise of suburbia and the impact of this attempt to create "safe" and segregated living spaces on gender and sexuality; the history of urban renewal and public housing; the structure of machine politics; racial and ethnic battles over jobs, housing and urban space in the context of both prosperity and deindustrialization; the national political repercussions of these local urban battles; and the cultural politics of contemporary gated communities and global cities. Note: This is a research course; it is strongly recommended for those considering the thesis option.

26:510:598 History of Technology, Environment, and Health: Theory and Method
Mondays, 5:00-7:40 p.m.
Stephen Pemberton
This course provides an introduction to the histories of technology, environment, and health while examining some of the diverse strategies that historians in these fields are currently using to make sense of the past.   We will explore what is distinctive about these fields of history, as well as what it means to engage in the historical study of technology, the health, medicine, science, and the environment.   How, for example, do historians of technology, environment, and health interpret society, culture, and politics?   What assumptions and approaches do they share with the social historian, the cultural historian, the political historian, or the student of global history?   How, for instance, do historians of technology, environment, and health treat matters of class, race, and gender?   And how have these historians employed the theories and methods of other scholarly disciplines in their work, including the insights of anthropologists, biologists, philosophers, political activists, and sociologists.    As these questions suggest, the principle goal of the course is to introduce the student of history to some of the vital ideas, scholarly trends, and methods that inform our efforts to gain historical perspective on matters of technology, environment, and/or health.

In addition to the readings and discussion, the student will write a final paper that will involve some limited research.   Though the readings from the course focus on the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries, research projects on any period, location or event are welcomed as long as it intersects with the themes and problems raised in the course. (The reading load in the second half of the course is lighter to leave the student time to pursue and develop individual projects.)

Summer 2008

26:510:516:T6 The West, Islam, and the Middle East
Jon Cowans
Mondays, 5:00PM, 324 Conklin Hall
5/27/08-08/13/08
This course examines the historical relationship between Europe/the West and the Islamic world of the Middle East and surrounding regions from the advent of Islam in the seventh century to today. In examining these controversial events, we will seek to understand the perspectives of various participants and observers and to analyze key patterns in the behavior of those involved and their perceptions of each other.

26:510:530:T6 Topics in European Cultural and Intellectual History: “Foucault and the History of Sexuality”
William A. Peniston
Wednesdays, 5:00PM, 324 Conklin Hall
5/27/08-08/13/08
This course will explore the theories of Michel Foucault on the development of modern sexuality in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries in Europe. The basic structure of the course is to focus on special topics by spending one week on the secondary literature and the following week on a primary source.

26:510:534:H6 TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY: “Cities and Suburbs in American History”
Thomas McCabe
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:00 PM, 446 Conklin Hall
07/07/08-08/13/08
Over the course of the twentieth century, the United States was transformed from an urban nation to a predominantly suburban one. This course will examine the social, cultural, economic, and spatial changes that resulted in both the “urban crisis” and the formation of a “suburban nation.” Among other themes, the readings probe the intersection of race, class, neighborhood, consumer culture, and public policies in the fast-growing field of metropolitan history.

Spring 2008

26:510:504 Reading and Writing Narrative History
Thursdays 5:00-7:40 PM
James Goodman
Reading and Writing Narrative History is a hybrid, part graduate seminar, part graduate writing workshop. And unlike most graduate courses, where the focus is on a particular time, place, approach, group of people, method, or theme, our focus shall be on one particular form of historical writing, one of the oldest forms of historical writing, narrative history. What is it? How it is similar to and different from other forms of historical writing? How should we read it, talk about it, criticize it, review it, and teach it? Should graduate students with so much read it and so little time to read it, read it at all? Should professional historians write it?

We shall spend our first six weeks reading, reading as writers read, for form as well as for content and, at our best, we for the relationship between the two, the relationship between what a particular writer wants to say and how he or she uses evidence, language, imagination, and the tools and tricks of the storytelling trade to say it. We shall read as shameless opportunists. What, we will ask at every turn, can we learn from each writer's successes and failures? What, when we sit down to write, can we imitate, borrow, or steal?

26:510:517 Capitalism and Socialism
Tuesdays 5-7:40 PM Conklin Hall, 338
Jon Cowans
The history of Western economic systems and ideologies from the origins of capitalism in early-modern Europe through the rise of socialism in the nineteenth century and social democracy in the twentieth century. Topics include the agricultural and industrial revolutions; liberal ideologies and policies of the nineteenth century; Marxism and socialist thought; the Soviet model; the Great Depression; growth of the welfare state after World War II; and the problem of underdevelopment.

26:510:552 American Intellectual and Cultural History: “Confronting Challenges in American Education”
(MAT students)
Wednesdays 6:00-9:00 PM Conklin Hall
Anna Stubblefield
In this graduate-level course, we will explore two broad questions: “What is the purpose of education?” and “How do we learn?” Throughout the course, we will explore these questions in relation to ongoing concerns about equal opportunity and inclusion in K-12 education: educational reform, standardized testing, multicultural education, and students with special needs.

First, we will consider what we mean when we talk about educating children for democratic citizenship and how this might be accomplished. One issue we will discuss is whether democracy or equality in education means bringing privileged knowledge to all students, thereby breaking down barriers traditionally erected along lines of race, class, and dis/ability, or whether it means valuing knowledge that has been traditionally discounted because it originates from experiences other than those of the elite (or some combination of the two, and can they be combined?) Readings will include (in some cases, excerpts from) Henry Giroux, Schooling and the Struggle for Public Life ; Michael Apple and Lois Weis, Ideology and Practice in Schooling ; Jane Martin, Cultural Miseducation ; and Mike Rose, The Mind at Work: Valuing the Intelligence of American Workers . We will also read and discuss at least parts of Sarason, The Predictable Failure of Educational Reform and related literature.

Second, we will do some brief review of the historical philosophical literature on how we learn (e.g., Plato, Rousseau, Piaget, Montessori, Dewey) but focus on more recent work, including Greene's work on imagination, Feuerstein's structural cognitive modifiability and mediated learning theory, Kohn on competition and reward systems in education, and Rodriguez and Bellanca ( What Is It About Me You Can't Teach? ) on “high expectations” instruction in urban education settings.

This will lead to a discussion of universal design in education, access to literacy (Kliewer, Biklen), and genuinely, across-the-board (race, gender, class, and dis/ability) inclusive classrooms (readings include chapters from Kluth, Straut, and Biklen, Access to Academics for All Students ). We may read some of Gleidman and Roth, The Unexpected Minority: Handicapped Children in America.

26:510:554 Topics in American Political and Legal History
Thursdays 5-7:40 PM Conklin Hall, 324
Annette Gordon-Reed
This seminar will explore the development of the political, legal, and economic system in the Early American Republic, highlighting the struggles over development in each of these areas. We will cover the debate over adopting the Constitution, the struggle between Jefferson and Hamilton, the development of political parties, and the beginning of westward expansion. We will also explore how slavery and regionalism contributed to the looming sectional crisis that would destroy, and then, transform the Union. Attention will be paid to the role of women during this time and the transformation of the American family.

26:510:563 Topics in the History of Health: “Heredity, Health, and Disease”
Mondays 5-7:40 PM Cullimore Hall (NJIT), 307
Stephen Pemberton
The theme for the course will be "Heredity, Health, and Disease."   It will cover a range of related topics that address how North Americans and Europeans have viewed the role of heredity in their efforts to promote health and prevent disease (primarily from the mid-19th century to the present).   Readings will focus on the Darwinian revolution, eugenics, the history of genetics and life science, the social and cultural origins of genetic medicine, ethical controversies surrounding hereditary/genetic knowledge, case studies of specific hereditary disease challenges, as well as popular understandings of such matters. The class will highlight issues of race, class, and social justice as they have stood in relation to hereditary, health, and disease over the past 150 years.

26:510:565 Public History
Tuesdays 5-7:40 PM Conklin Hall, 324
Clement A. Price
This course is inspired by recent conflicts over the presentation of American history in public venues, including the Smithsonian Institution, the Library of Congress, Colonial Williamsburg, and the Liberty Bell Pavilion. The course explores ongoing debates on the construction of the past in documentary and dramatic film and the public perception that American history has lost its resonance as a positive narrative on democracy. The course also reflects professor's interest in encouraging graduate students in history to consider the public realm for professional historical work. Toward those objectives, the course will focus on recent controversies surrounding what might be called “history in the public square,” which is marked by intense debates on revisionist history, public sensibilities about the past, and the role of historians in and out of the academy. Among the topics we will consider will be the state of American history during the “Culture Wars”; exhibiting the “new history” in an age of conservative liberalism; historical film as methodology and genre; “nearby history” as revealed in the New Jersey public history movement, and conflicts over the teaching of history in the United States. Students will become familiar with theoretical and practical approaches to the presentation of history for the general public. Course requirements include assigned weekly readings, book reviews, and film and exhibition critiques. Students will also form exploratory teams that will examine and critique current or recently completed projects in public history.

26:510:585 Narrating Race: Research Seminar on “Race” and American Studies
Mondays 5-7:40 PM Conklin Hall,
Ruth Feldstein
This research seminar will explore the variety of topics and approaches that scholars from various disciplines use to research and write about “race” in the United States.   By considering the themes that scholars interested in race bring to the fore, as well as the methods and approaches that American Studies as a field draws on in scholarship on race, students will develop the skills they need to research and write independent research papers.  

26:510:590: Problems and Readings in African History: “Aspects of African Response to European Rule”
Wednesdays, 5:00 to 7:40 p.m., Conklin Hall, 324
Said Samatar
This seminar deals with the phenomenon known as the “European Scramble for Africa”—conquest, consequent colonization and the rise of mass nationalist movements whose resistance struggles resulted in the final ejection of Europe from Africa.   In particular, this part deals with “Response Issues”: 1. flight 2. collaboration 3. Resistance 4. Diplomatic maneuverings  

Fall 2007

26:510:506 POETICS OF HISTORY: CREATIVE WRITING/NON-FICTION
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 PM
James Goodman
(Open to history students by instructor permisson only: goodmanj@andromeda.rutgers.edu)
Non-Fiction Writing Workshop: Workshop in the art and craft of non-fiction writing.   Students working in the widest variety of forms--essay and personal essay; creative non-fiction; narrative and other literary forms of academic history; popular history; literary journalism; biography; memoir; and more--will present work-in-progress for discussion and criticism.   Every student will present work at least twice a term and shortly after each presentation meet independently with their instructor.   Permission of the instructor is required for registration.

26:510:525 Colloquium in the History of Women
Wednesdays, 5:00-7:30 PM
Beryl Satter
This course surveys classic and recent works on the history of women in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Topics covered include the gradual coalescence of newly intertwined ideas about gender, race, class, and political virtue in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; the nineteenth century the emergence of the "true woman," or the belief that women were the pure, pious, and passive opposites of men in; the acceptance, manipulation of or challenges to that image of womanhood posed by working class, African-American, Mexican-American, Chinese-American and Native-American women; slavery, abolitionism and emergence of female political activism in the late nineteenth-century; and the long history of assertion of and backlash against female equality in the twentieth century.

26:510:543 TOPICS IN WORLD HISTORY:   EVOLUTION OF THE GLOBAL SYSTEM
Tuesdays, 5:00-7:30 PM
Susan Carruthers
Since the end of the cold war, “globalization” has been a ubiquitous buzzword—endlessly repeated, yet poorly understood and susceptible to myriad interpretations. Is it shrinking and compressing time and space, creating a “borderless world”? Is it producing a homogenous “McWorld”, or widening economic disparities between the global haves and have-nots, and occasioning increasingly violent forms of resistance (of which terrorism may be one)? Or might it be simultaneously binding and fracturing communities far distant from one another?

This course takes as its starting point an understanding of “globalization” as more than simply a convenient label to denote the period since the cold war's collapse. It therefore sets out to trace the historical trajectory of a variety of globalizing processes, and the evolution of various forms of “globalism”—as embodied in international regimes, organizations, and social and cultural movements. Topics covered will include the development of Empire; the expansion of global trade (in commodities and human beings); the emergence of the states-system; connections between war and globalization; and the current operations of the “neo-liberal” order (in both its economic and political forms, including the recent emergence of a human rights-inflected challenge to norms of state sovereignty).

In sum, the course seeks to consider:

* a variety of ways of conceiving and theorizing “the global”
* the changing character, and degree of globality, of this system (or these systems)
* forms of resistance to it/them

26:510:549 The Making of Race in Latin America , 1492 to the Present
Thursdays, 5:00-7:30 PM
Karen Caplan
Since 1492, Latin America has been the site of intense encounters between indigenous people, people of European descent, and people of African descent. One important result is that Latin Americans have developed complex ways of conceiving of distinctions among and between themselves. Beginning with the pre-history of European conquest and ending in the present, this course asks how and why such distinctions developed, and what impact they have had on politics and culture in Latin America . Many historians and social scientists have argued that Latin Americans, because of the high degree of intermixture between people of different backgrounds, have developed notions of difference based less on a concept of “race” than on one of “color.” This course will examine this claim and ask what—if anything—is indeed unique about Latin American social distinctions. In doing so, we will also ask how these claims have been shaped by the view from the United States and Europe, and whether the task of comparison is useful for understanding race in global perspective.

26:510:551 AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL & CULTURAL HISTORY: INTRO TO AMERICAN STUDIES
Mondays, 5:00-7:30 PM
Ruth Feldstein
This class offers an intellectual mapping of American Studies as a field, with a consideration of where the field has been, where it is going, and the issues with which scholars of American Studies are currently engaged.

26: 510: 595 THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF AMERICAN MEDICINE SINCE 1800
Tuesdays, 5:00-7:30 PM
Stephen Pemberton
This course provides an overview of the social history of medicine in the United States from the era of the early republic to the late twentieth century. The readings and discussions will utilize the histories of medicine, health and disease as a window onto a changing American society. Of particular focus will be the enduring roles of class, race, and gender. We will see, for instance, how medical and health issues reflect and illuminate matters of class, race and gender in America, how social movements have impacted efforts to promote health (including Jacksonian populism, 19th-century evangelical Protestantism, women's suffrage, and Civil Rights), how industrialism, big business, and consumerism have influenced medical and public health practice, and how the federal government has invested in medicine and health and developed health care policy.   Topics also include the emergence of the medical profession; the relations between medical concepts, therapies, and mainstream social thought; the character of regular and alternative healing movements; the social context of medical innovation, experimentation, and progress; the social history of hospitals and other medical institutions; changing medical responses to infectious and chronic disease; as well as debates about health care in the United States.

26:510:597 Technology, Culture and History
Wednesdays, 5:00-7:30 PM
Richard B. Sher
(Students that have already taken 510:520 with R. Sher should not register for this course)
This course will treat the relationships between technology and culture in a variety of historical and geographical settings. It will examine the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life and the ways that technologies are adapted and exchanged by different societies. It will also consider environmental and organic factors underlying technological developments; connections between technology and concepts of time and space; technology in relation to the study of 20th-century global history; and the culture of “technological communities” – both historical and fictional.

26:478:587 TOPICS “War and Peace 1890 – 1955: Power, Conflict and Institutions”
(Course is listed under Global Affairs, Index # 34883, and is open to history students for credit)
Thursdays, 5:00-7:40 PM
Richard Langhorne
This course will examine the history of a distinct period of almost continuous warfare among the greater states from 1903 to 1945. It will look for the profound causes of war and investigate the precise occasions of their outbreak. The course will also study the creation and failure of the human institutional response to war and its rising destructiveness from the collapse of the Concert of Europe in 1914, through the abandonment of the League of Nations to the making of the United Nations.

Part I:   The Collapse of the Concert of Europe and the coming of war in 1914
1: Introduction:   the emergence of a global political system after 1897
2:   Crisis in East Asia (the Far East ) 1893 – 1902: the first Sino-Japanese War
3:   Crisis in East Asia 1902 – 1905:   the Russo-Japanese War
4:   The rise of Imperial Germany and its consequences
5:   Three European crises:   Morocco1905/06, Bosnia-Herzogovina 1908/09, Agadir 1911
6:    War in 1914

Part II:   The failure of the League and the resumption of war
7:    The 1919 settlement
8:    The League of Nations
9:   Wars in East Asia 1931 – 1941
10:   Political extremism and war in Europe 1936 – 1941
11:   The Second World War 1941 – 1945
12:    The consequences  

26:988:532 FEMINIST THEORY: “History and Theory of Women's Studies”
(Course is listed under Women's Studies, Index #30546 and counts toward Women's Studies Concentration)
Tuesdays, 5:30-8:10 PM
Fran Bartkowski
This core course will focus primarily on the intellectual history within which feminism has come to be defined.   As social and political forces have changed the map of the world, the everyday lives of women have changed.   As laws and constitutions are framed, as religions are established, the situation of women is reframed accordingly.   This course will address the complex dynamic of women's histories in various times and places as it intersects with gendered social and cultural formations. Cross-cultural issues and differences will be crucial to this seminar.   The development of feminist theory will be contextualized within differing global histories.   How feminist inquiry has changed will be historicized.

Summer 2007

26:510:514: 'U.S. Diplomatic History"
Prof. Warren Kimball
1st class, June 12, 2007, 7:30 p.m., Conklin 324
2nd class, June 13, 2007, 7:30 p.m., Conklin 324
3rd class, June 14, 2007, 7:30 p.m., Conklin 324
and by arrangement thereafter
This is a 3-credit seminar designed to give students an opportunity to do one of the things that historians do--write a paper based on archival research.   Although there are no requirements as to which archives you can use, we are fortunate to have a great many archives here in the NY/NJ metropolitan area, so you can minimize your travel.   Nor is Washington , DC , very far.   This course can serve as an introduction to archival research for new students, or as an opportunity to do further work on possible or approved thesis and/or dissertation topics.   We will try to focus your work in an area and/or areas where your research can be mutually supportive (also useful for car-pooling to the archives), and where I can be of some help.   The details will have to await our initial meeting when we can determine our “druthers.”   The broad subject will be the History of American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy.   The specific subject matter will be determined by our mutual interests and the availability of archival and printed sources.

The bulk of your time will be spent doing research outside of class and we will modify the class schedule to allow enough time.   We will schedule a progress meeting for sometime in mid-July, and set up a more formal set of progress reports/outlines in mid-summer.   In between, I will be available for one-on-one consultations.   Attendance at the first class on June 12, 2007 is indispensable.  

For more information contact Professor Kimball at wkimball@andromeda.rutgers.edu.

26:510:547: Comparative World Colonialism
Prof. Jon Cowans
05/29/07-07/06/07: Mondays and Thursdays, 5:00 to 7:30 p.m., Conklin 324
This seminar will examine the interactions of Europeans and non-Europeans after 1500. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analysis of the colonial experience in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

26:510:590: Problems and Readings in African History
Prof. Said Samatar
05/29/07-07/06/07: Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 5:00 to 7:30 p.m., Conklin 324
This seminar deals with the phenomenon known as the “European Scramble for Africa”—conquest, consequent colonization and the rise of mass nationalist movements whose resistance struggles resulted in the final ejection of Europe from Africa.  In particular, this part deals with “Response Issues”: 1. flight 2. collaboration 3. Resistance 4. Diplomatic maneuverings

Spring 2007

26:510:505 History in Fiction and Fact
Mondays 5-7:30 Conklin Hall, 324
Jim Goodman
History in fiction and fact juxtaposes closely related worlds of history, biography, memoir, and fiction in order to explore the past, the nature of historical understanding, and the possibilities of creative historical writing.

In this class, which is part graduate seminar and part history writing workshop, we shall explore a few historical events and problems--and the character of historical understanding and historical writing themselves--by juxtaposing closely related works of history, biography, memoir, and fiction. We shall start with six weeks of reading.   Our attention will be divided: On the one hand we will read for content, thinking hard about the past--about what happened and the meaning and significance of what happened.   On the other hand we will read for form, thinking about the relations between history and fiction; the similarities and differences between truth in history and truth in fiction; the ways in which historians and novelists use facts, sources, evidence, narrative, analysis, and imagination to arrive at historical understanding and truths; the literary dimensions of historical literature and the historical dimension of fiction.   We will practice criticizing history as literature and fiction as history.   And then you shall set up and write about a juxtaposition of your own.  

26:510:529 Topics in European Intellectual and Cultural History, 1650-1850: “Enlightenment, Empire, and National Identity in 18th-Century Britain ”
Wednesdays 5-7:30 Cullimore Hall 307 (NJIT)
Richard B. Sher
The eighteenth century was the age of the Enlightenment.   It also witnessed the emergence of Great Britain as a unified political entity as well as the ascendancy of the British Empire as the most powerful imperial force in the world, even after the loss of its most important North American colonies. This course will examine the interplay of these phenomena. Against the backdrop of imperial war and empire, and the consumer culture that empire nurtured, we shall examine the nature of the Enlightenment in the two principal parts of Great Britain (England and Scotland), with attention to such themes as the growth and significance of sociability and politeness, the representation of gender, the writing of cultural history, the social uses of science and technology, the production and dissemination of enlightened print culture, and the competition among notions of English, Scottish, and British national identity.

26:510:545 European History since 1850: "Modernity and the Masses"
Thursdays 5-7:30 Conklin 338
Eva Giloi
This course focuses on one of the most significant developments of modern Europe : the rise and influence of “the masses” from the 1890s to the 1930s.   Drawing on both contemporary and historiographical sources, it examines the political power of the masses, with an endpoint in the radical populist movements of the 1920s and 1930s (in particular, fascism).   It explores the promises, pitfalls and discontents of an expanding parliamentary democracy.   It examines the attempts of elites to come to terms with the social and economic impact of urbanization – through policing, philanthropy, incarceration and imperialism.   And it considers how ideas of popular sovereignty led to virulent nationalism, how gender was experienced in the new cities, how the new mass media created a society of spectacle, and how purveyors of elite art attempted to resist the democratizing elements of popular culture.

26:510:554 Topics in American Political and Legal History
Tuesdays 5-7:30 Conklin Hall, 324
Annette Gordon-Reed
This seminar will explore the development of the political, legal, and economic system in the Early American Republic , highlighting the struggles over development in each of these areas. We will cover the debate over adopting the Constitution, the struggle between Jefferson and Hamilton , the development of political parties, and the beginning of westward expansion. We will also explore how slavery and regionalism contributed to the looming sectional crisis that would destroy, and then, transform the Union . Attention will be paid to the role of women during this time and the transformation of the American family.

26:510:555 Selected Topics in American Urban and Ethnic History
Wednesdays 5-7:30 Conklin 324
Beryl Satter
This course draws on classic and recent studies to examine key themes in the history of the post-1945 American city.    Topics covered include the rise of suburbia and the impact of this attempt to create "safe" and segregated living spaces on gender and sexuality; the history of urban renewal and public housing; the structure of machine politics; racial and ethnic battles over jobs, housing and urban space in the context of both prosperity and deindustrialization; the national political repercussions of these local urban battles; and the cultural politics of contemporary gated communities and global cities.

26:510:565 Public History
Tuesdays 5-7:30 Conklin 338
Clement A. Price
This course is inspired by recent conflicts over the presentation of American history in public venues, including the Smithsonian Institution, the Library of Congress, Colonial Williamsburg, and the Liberty Bell Pavilion. The course explores on going debates on the construction of the past in documentary and dramatic film and the public perception that American history has lost its resonance as a positive narrative on democracy. The course also reflects professor's interest in encouraging graduate students in history to consider the public realm for professional historical work. Toward those objectives, the course will focus on recent controversies surrounding what might be called “history in the public square,” which is marked by intense debates on revisionist history, public sensibilities about the past, and the role of historians in and out of the academy. Among the topics we will consider will be the state of American history during the “Culture Wars”; exhibiting the “new history” in an age of conservative liberalism; historical film as methodology and genre; “nearby history” as revealed in the New Jersey public history movement, and conflicts over the teaching of history in the United States. Students will be become familiar with theoretical and practical approaches to the presentation of history for the general public. Course requirements include assigned weekly readings, book reviews, and film and exhibition critiques. Students will also form exploratory teams that will examine and critique current or recently completed projects in public history.

History 598: History of Technology, Environment, and Medicine:“Theory and Method”
Thursdays 5-7:30 Conklin 324
Neil Maher
The goals of this course are threefold.   We will begin the semester with a four week introduction to the three fields under consideration — the history of technology, environmental history, and the history of medicine — and then dedicate the rest of the semester to reading innovative works that attempt to bridge these three areas of study.   Second, we will examine how these three fields together draw on and influence historical categories such as race, class, and gender, as well as a variety of sub-disciplines including social, political, and cultural history.   And finally, the class will explore several methodological and theoretical approaches to better understand how they inform this interrelationship among the history of technology, environment, and medicine.

Fall 2006

26:510:506 Poetics of History
Mondays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Jim Goodman
In this seminar (which like all my graduate seminars shall be part reading course and part writing workshop), we shall explore the narrator's voice in historical writing (and non-fiction writing more generally). Voice is an element of historical writing that critics, even the most literary-minded and theoretically inclined, almost always take for granted or completely ignore. We shall listen closely to the voices of the narrators in several different historical forms, ask questions about narrators and voice that rarely get asked, and think hard the place of voice, the varieties of voice, and the possibilities of voice in historical writing. Then students shall write an essay or story based on research in primary sources, an essay or story in which the narrator's voice is an element of narration, exposition, or analysis that no reader could possibly ignore.

26:510:537 Problems in Ancient World: “Athenian Democracy”
Mondays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Gary Farney
This course will explore the political system and political culture of Athens during its "democratic" period (focusing on the fifth and fourth centuries BC) through a close examination of the original sources and modern scholarship. Readings in the ancient sources will include significant excerpts of (in translation) Aristotle, Plato, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plutarch, Aristophanes, Aeschylus, Euripides and Sophocles.

Special attention will be devoted to: how and why each organ of Athens' government developed; what ancient writers thought of democracy; how well ancient democracy sat with aggressive imperialism; and who was included or left out of Athen's "democracy".

26:510:549 Topics in Latin American History: “Latin America and the U.S.”
Wednesdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Karen Caplan
The relationship between the United States and the countries of Latin America has always been a particularly close one, because of geographical proximity, cultural contact, and economic ties. It has also been a particularly conflictual one, marked by violence and deep inequities. This course explores both the closeness and the conflict, looking both at the integration of the U.S. and Latin America and the tension between the neighbors. Although the formal political relationship between nations is a central theme, this is by no means a traditional course on diplomatic history. Instead, we will be looking at these political relationships in their broader contexts—economic, social, and cultural. Most importantly, at every step of the way, we will address these relationships from multiple perspectives, asking not only how they look from both sides of the border, but also to the various groups in society that have felt the impact of the ties between nations and people.

26:510:562 Urban Environment
Tuesdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Neil Maher
This reading seminar provides an introduction to the new field of urban environmental history. In it we will explore the ever-changing interrelationship over time between American cities and urban and exurban nature. While I have organized this course thematically, we will examine the environmental history of urban America through three thematic lenses. First, we will analyze how society used nature in a variety of ways to construct cities across the American landscape.

Second, we will focus on how these urban areas in turn transformed nature both within cities and beyond their borders, often in unintended and hazardous ways. And finally, we will turn to the various ways urbanites responded to the environmental threats associated with living in an American city. Such a reading will allow us to assess the state of the urban environmental history field today.

26:510:583 Problems and Readings in American History 1912-1945
Wednesdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Beryl Satter
The first half of the twentieth century witnessed dramatic shifts in U.S. racial ideologies, gender relations, patterns of sexuality, and patterns of labor. It also witnessed two major periods of political reform (the Progressive Era, 1890-1920, and the New Deal, 1933-38). In order to understand how historians have interpreted these changes, we will read political, intellectual, labor, and narrative histories; women's history; histories of racial ideologies and sexual ideologies; and histories of immigration and of early twentieth-century U.S. imperialism.

26:510:596 History of the Body in Modern Western Culture
Thursdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Stephen Pemberton
This reading course examines the implications of changing medical practices and scientific understandings in Western culture on experiences of the body in everyday life. Over the last three centuries, medicine and science have been increasingly central to European and North American expectations about life, death, education, welfare and human potential. Such expectations have been intimately linked to evolving cultural understandings of the body. They have also frequently impacted how persons living within Western culture (or exposed to it) have experienced their bodies and world, and sought to understand, if not modify that experience. As such, the course’s focus on cultural understandings of medicine and science will act as a lens onto Western conceptions of modernity as well as changing experiences of bodies.

The readings and discussions will examine some of the major historical shifts in Western bodily perception and practice as well as some of the enduring continuities that have been central to Western conceptions of the body in the modern era. Gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and species: these are just some of the key distinctions that will be examined in a series of readings designed to elucidate Western bodily experiences. In addition to the themes announced above, topics will include important historical work on pain, illness, and bodily enhancement, as well as recent work in the history of disability and colonial/post-colonial medicine. The course treats “Western” culture broadly, and the final section of the course will explore how Western bodily experiences have been exported, imagined, and modified in contact with “non-Western” cultures in Africa and Australia.

Book readings include:
Barbara Duden, The Woman Beneath the Skin: A Doctor’s Patients in Eighteenth-Century Germany
Ruth Richardson, Death, Dissection, and the Destitute
Joanne Meyerowitz, How Sex Changed: A History of Transexuality in the United States
Warwick Anderson, The Cultivation of Whiteness: Science, Health, and Racial Destiny in Australia
Julie Livingston, Debility and the Moral Imagination in Botswana

Selected chapters or essays from the following:
Roselyne Rey, The History of Pain
David Morris, The Culture of Pain
Michael Sappol, A Traffic of Dead Bodies: Anatomy and Embodied Social Identity in Nineteenth-Century America
Michel Foucault, Herculine Barbin: Being the Recently Discovered Memoirs of a Nineteenth-Century French Hermaphrodite
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality: An Introduction
Thomas Laqueur, Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud
Charles Rosenberg, No Other Gods: On Science and American Social Thought
Anson Rabinbach, Energy, Fatigue, and the Origins of Modernity
Katherine Ott, David Serlin, and Stephen Mihm, ed. Artificial Parts, Practical Lives: Modern Histories of Prosthetics
Bonnie Smith and Beth Hutchinson, ed. Gendering Disability
Paul Longmore and Lauri Umansky, ed. The New Disability History: American Perspectives

Summer 2006

26:510:527 Selected Topics in European Political and Diplomatic History: “History of Democracy”
5/30/06 to 7/06/06: Mondays and Thursdays 5:00 to 7:30 p.m., Conklin 324
Dr. Jon Cowans
The history of democracy from ancient Greece and Rome to its revival in early modern Europe and America and its development in the 20th century. Topics include the origins, theory, and practice of democracy; historical notions of public opinion and its role in democracy; the nature of the public sphere and citizen participation.

26:510:553 Selected Topics in American Political and Legal History: “International Politics of America’s 20th Century World Wars”
Course will meet on the following dates ONLY: Monday, June 12th from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m., Tuesday, June 13th from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Wednesday, June 14th, Time TBA, Conklin 338
Dr. Warren Kimball
This 3-credit seminar is designed to give students an opportunity to write a paper based on archival research. The NY/NJ/NEastern region has many archives, so you can minimize your travel. This course can serve as an introduction to archival research for new students, or an opportunity to do further work on thesis/ dissertation topics. The broad subject is the International Politics of America’s 20th Century World Wars. Students from previous summer seminars are welcome. Initial classes are to discuss subject selection and research techniques. Class schedule will be modified to allow time for archival research. Attendance at the first class on Monday, 12 June (5:30 p.m., room 338 Conklin Hall, Newark campus) is indispensable.

26:510:558 Selected Topics in European Social and Economic History: “The Social History of Sexuality”
5/30/06 to 8/16/06: Wednesdays, 5:00 to 7:30 p.m., Conklin 324
Dr. William Peniston
This course will explore the development of modern sexuality in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries in Europe. Following a general overview of sexuality in the 18th century, this course will then focus on courtship and marriage, prostitution and homosexuality, all in the 19th century. It will conclude with an examination of sexuality in the 20th century. The basic structure of the course will be to focus on special topics by spending one week on the secondary literature and the following week on a primary source.

Spring 2006

26:510:504 Reading and Writing Narrative History
Wednesdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. James Goodman
This graduate seminar is a hybrid, part history seminar, part history writing workshop.  And unlike most graduate courses, where the focus is on a particular time, place, approach, group of people, method, or theme, our focus shall be on one particular form of historical writing, one of the oldest forms of historical writing, narrative history.  We shall ask questions like these: What is narrative history?  How is it similar to and different from other forms of historical writing?  What is its history?  How should we read it, talk about it, criticize it, review it, and teach it?  Should graduate students (with so much to read and so little time to read it) read it at all?  Should graduate students consider writing it?  Should anyone?  I make no attempt to survey the history of narrative history (with all the writing and writing workshops there simply isn't time), and I vary the readings from year to year.  But I almost always include some ancient history (this year I am considering the "Deuteronomist's History"; other years I have used Herodotus, Thucydides, Tacitus, and Livy) as well as some modern and so-called "new."

26:510:532 Topics in U.S. Diplomatic History: The United States and Empire
Thursdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Susan Carruthers
Can a state be both anti-colonial in its self-image and imperial in its practices? If so, how are the contradictions kept in check? Was U.S. imperialism at the turn of the nineteenth century an aberrant moment in its history, or does imperialism, in various guises, typify America 's interactions with other peoples and regions? This course explores problematic questions surrounding US/global relationships, and the character of American power—economic, military, and cultural.

America 's vexed relationship with empire has long animated historical enquiry, generating considerable debate and methodological diversity. In the wake of the U.S. occupation of Iraq , it has become the subject of much heated controversy. The course examines a rich historiographical tradition as well as some more recent excurses on the United States and empire. Temporally, works selected for study span the period from the construction of a “Republican Empire” in North America, through the 1890s—with the acquisition of territories in the Pacific and Caribbean —to the present day.

The readings have been chosen to provide students with a sense of chronological progression. However, they also represent a wide array of scholarly approaches to the study of empire, from both the humanities and social sciences, enabling us to reflect on questions such as:

*what constitutes “empire”, and what forces propel and shape it
*what distinguishes U.S. imperialism from previous/other historical empires
*the implication of race and gender in imperialism
*resistance and anti-imperialism—in the core and at the periphery

Students will be required to produce weekly discussion points, and to write two papers over the course of the semester.

26: 510:547 Comparative World Colonialism: Nationalism and Colonialism in South Asia
Tuesdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Prachi Deshpande
This course examines the concepts of colonialism and nationalism, through the specific example of British colonialism in India in the period c.1700-1950. Nationalism is a global phenomenon: people have struggled everywhere for separate nationhood and much human and material loss has been attributed to nationalism. One of the many contradictions of nationalism is that it is universal and yet it has specific histories in different parts of the world. How does nationalist sentiment relate to class, religion, race and gender, and most importantly, colonialism? These are some of the contradictions and issues that this course will address.

We will read theorists like Anderson, Chatterjee and Gellner and a major theme of the course will be to address the question of “non-western” and “anti-colonial” nationalism. We will consider the example of Indian nationalism in this regard. We will look at the conditions under which nationalism emerged in the Indian subcontinent, its political and cultural dimensions and its contribution to the eventual partition of India into the two nation-states of India and Pakistan in 1947.

26:510:571 Introduction to Historical Method: Culture and Power
Mondays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Eva Giloi
This course introduces students of history to the prominent trends in historiography of the past few decades.   It focuses on what has been called “the new cultural history,” that is, the intersection of culture and power.   Students will read and discuss works by prominent social theorists and historians, and will consider the methodological implications of these different theoretical approaches.   Topics include the Marxist origins of cultural criticism; anthropological and Foucauldian alternatives; theories of cultural reproduction and resistance.   The seminar will give students an understanding of the dominant conceptual terms of present-day historiography, including such terms as: hegemony, discourse, orientalism, ‘deep play,' subaltern studies, the annales school, the public sphere, ‘distinction,' cultural capital, cultural poaching, and the techniques of domination and resistance.

The seminar aims to help students place historical works in the context of recent theoretical debates about the nature and origin of power.   It is aimed equally at masters students interested in continuing in a PhD program in history, and students more generally interested in the latest theories in cultural history.

26:510:590 Problems and Readings in African History:
Colonial Africa: Aspects of African Response to European Rule
Mondays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Said Samatar
This is the second of a two-part seminar dealing with the phenomenon known as the “European Scramble for Africa”—conquest, consequent colonization and the rise of mass nationalist movements whose resistance struggles resulted in the final ejection of Europe from Africa.   In particular, this second part deals with “Response Issues”: 1. Flight 2. Collaboration 3. Resistance 4. Diplomatic maneuverings  

Readings

    Introduction to African History.   Oliver and Atmore. Africa Since 1800.
    Joseph Conrad.   Heart of Darkness .   A vivid depiction of the brutality of the system and a scathing indictment of European pretensions to civilize Africa .
    Chinua Achebe.    Things Fall Apart.    Contact and Recoil
    T. O. Ranger.   “Connexions Betweeen ‘Primary” Movements and Mass Nationalist Movements in East and Central Africa .” Parts I & II.   (To be picked up at Portaprint, 25 Halsey street Telephone (973) 622-1828)
    Samatar.   Oral Poetry and Somali Nationalism .   The Somali Dervish Resistance Examined.
    _________.   In the Shadow of Conquest.   A Survey of 7 Resistance movements
    _________     With David Laitin.   Somalia : Nation in Search of a State .

26:510:598 History of Technology, Environment, and Health: Theory and Method
Thursdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Stephen Pemberton
This course provides an introduction to the histories of technology, environment, and health while examining some of the diverse strategies that historians in these fields are currently using to make sense of the past.   We will explore what is distinctive about these fields of history, as well as what it means to engage in the historical study of technology, the health, medicine, science, and the environment.   How, for example, do historians of technology, environment, and health interpret society, culture, and politics?   What assumptions and approaches do they share with the social historian, the cultural historian, the political historian, or the student of global history?   How, for instance, do historians of technology, environment, and health treat matters of class, race, and gender?   And how have these historians employed the theories and methods of other scholarly disciplines in their work, including the insights of anthropologists, biologists, philosophers, political activists, and sociologists.    As these questions suggest, the principle goal of the course is to introduce the student of history to some of the vital ideas, scholarly trends, and methods that inform our efforts to gain historical perspective on matters of technology, environment, and/or health.

In addition to the readings and discussion, the student will write a final paper of 15-20 pages in length that will involve some limited research.  For this paper, the student will select a primary document of interest to her or him that also concerns a subject of relevance to the history of technology, environment, and/or health.   Though the readings from the course focus on the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries, I welcome research projects on any period, location or event as long as it intersects with the themes and problems raised in the course. [Note: The reading load in the second half of the course is lighter to leave the student time to pursue and develop your individual projects.]

Readings include the following books and a variety of shorter readings:

Ruth Schwartz Cowan, A Social History of American Technology (Oxford University Press, 1997)
William Cronon, Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West (Norton, 1992)
Alfred Crosby, The Columbian Exchange: The Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492 (Praeger Paperback, 30th Anniversary edition, 2003)
Robert Kohler, Lords of the Fly: Drosophila Genetics and the Experimental Life (University of Chicago Press, 1994)
Charles Rosenberg, The Cholera Years: The United States in 1832, 1849, and 1866 (University of Chicago Press, 1987)
Keith Wailoo, Drawing Blood: Technology and Disease Identity in Twentieth Century America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997)

26:510:599 The Social History of Communication
Wednesdays 5:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Dr.   Richard B. Sher
This course considers communication as a social and historical phenomenon, subject to enormous variation according to time and place, yet always central to human activity. Themes will include orality and literacy; the rise of printing; the information revolution of the Enlightenment; the emergence of electric and electronic communication technologies; and specialized uses of communication such as propaganda. Among the authors who will be discussed are Harold Innis, Walter Ong, Elizabeth Eisenstein, Roger Chartier, Robert Darnton, and Marshall McLuhan.

Fall 2005

26:510:505 History of Fiction and Fact
Tuesdays 5:00-7:20 p.m.
Dr. Jim Goodman
In this class, which is part graduate seminar and part history writing workshop, we shall explore a few historical events and problems--and the character of historical understanding and historical writing themselves--by juxtaposing closely related works of history, biography, memoir, and fiction.

We shall start with six weeks of reading. Our attention will be divided: On the one hand we will read for content, thinking hard about the past--about what happened and the meaning and significance of what happened. On the other hand we will read for form, thinking about the relations between history and fiction; the similarities and differences between truth in history and truth in fiction; the ways in which historians and novelists use facts, sources, evidence, narrative, analysis, and imagination to arrive at historical understanding and truths; the literary dimensions of historical literature and the historical dimension of fiction.

We will practice criticizing history as literature and fiction as history. Then you will devote a month to the research for and writing of a history of your own. We will conclude the course with four weeks of intensive history writing workshops, in which each of you will present a late-draft of a short of history to the class for discussion. Thesis-writers-to-be interested in novels and other formal literary texts will get a sense of the variety of ways that historians can use (and the variety of ways that they can misuse) novels as primary sources for their historical narrative and historical interpretation. Thesis-writers interested in experimenting with the form of their thesis will get a sense of the approaches and techniques they might borrow from novelists and writers of imaginative non-fiction-- and also a sense of the boundaries they dare not cross.

26:510:525 Colloquium in the History of Women
Mondays 5:00-7:20 p.m.
Dr. Beryl Satter
This course surveys classic and recent works on the history of women in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Topics covered include the gradual coalescence of newly intertwined ideas about gender, race, class, and political virtue in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; the nineteenth century the emergence of the "true woman," or the belief that women were the pure, pious, and passive opposites of men in; the acceptance, manipulation of or challenges to that image of womanhood posed by working class, African-American, Mexican-American, Chinese-American and Native-American women; slavery, abolitionism and emergence of female political activism in the late nineteenth-century; and the long history of assertion of and backlash against female equality in the twentieth century.

26:510:529 Selected Topics in European Intellectual and Cultural History: Early Modern Europe
Mondays 5:00-7:20 p.m.
Dr. Jon Cowans
Examination of issues and methods in European intellectual and cultural history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

26:510:548 Environmental History of North America
Wednesdays 5:00-7:20 p.m.
Dr. Neil Maher
This reading seminar provides an introduction to the field of environmental history. In it we will explore the ever changing relationship between the nature and culture of the North American continent. We will examine this history through three thematic lenses. First, we will be exploring how the natural environment shaped the patterns of human life in various parts of the continent. Second, we will be tracing the shifting ideologies towards nature held by North Americans during different periods of their nation’s histories. And finally, we will be analyzing how these ideas and human activities regarding nature combined in ways that reshaped the North American landscape. Such an approach will help us better understand the transnational history of the North American continent. While we will begin the semester reading several of the so-called environmental history "classics", the goal of the course is to examine some of the newest and most innovative works in the field today.

26:510:549 Topics in Latin American History: The Making of Race in Latin America
Wednesdays 5:00-7:20 p.m.
Dr. Karen Caplan
Since 1492, Latin America has been the site of intense encounters between indigenous people, people of European descent, and people of African descent. One important result is that Latin Americans have developed complex ways of conceiving of distinctions among and between themselves. Beginning with the pre-history of European conquest and ending in the late twentieth century, this course asks how and why such distinctions developed, and what impact they have had on politics and culture in Latin America. Many historians have argued that Latin Americans, because of the high degree of intermixture between people of different backgrounds, have developed notions of difference based less on a concept of “race” than on one of “color.” This course will examine this claim and ask what—if anything—is indeed unique about Latin American social distinctions. Moreover, as we approach the modern period, the course will focus on three related questions about Latin America and the United States. First, is it useful to compare Latin American racial constructions with those of the U.S., given their comparable history of racial encounter? Second, how have differences in these regions’ notions of race affected the relationship between Latin Americans and a United States government that acted as an imperial force in the hemisphere? And finally, what has happened when Latin Americans, as part of a massive influx of immigrants, have brought their racial ideas and experiences to the U.S. with them?

26:510:595 Social History of American Medicine Since 1800
Thursdays 5:00-7:20 p.m.
Dr. Stephen Pemberton
This course provides an overview of the social history of medicine in the United States from the Revolutionary era to the present. The readings and discussions will utilize the histories of medicine, health and disease as a window onto a changing American society. We will examine the emergence of the medical profession; the relations between medical concepts, therapies, and mainstream social thought; the role of class, race, and gender in the medical world and American society more broadly, the character of regular and alternative healing movements; the nature of medical innovation, experimentation, and progress; the emergence of medicine as big business; the histories of medical institutions and specialties; changing medical responses to infectious and chronic disease; as well as ongoing debates on the future of health care in the United States. This is a reading course focused on understanding the field of the history of medicine. The student will write three papers, each having different scope and requirements.

A partial list of readings:
Laurel Thatcher Ullrich, A Midwife's Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812
Paul Starr, The Social Transformation of American Medicine
James Whorton, Nature's Cures: The History of Alternative Medicine in America
Charles E. Rosenberg, The Care of Strangers: The Rise of America's Hospital System
Allan Brandt, No Magic Bullet: A Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States Since 1880
James Jones, Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment
David Rothman, Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision Making

Spring 2005

26:510:506 Poetics of History: New Histories
Professor James Goodman
Tuesdays, 5:00-7:30 p.m.
“What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; and there is nothing new under the sun.” So said Ecclesiastes, and common sense suggests that most historians would see the kernel of truth in his ancient words. The study of the past is the study not only of what has changed but also what has stayed the same, the study of continuity as well as of change. We explore patterns, echoes, cycles, refashioning and revisions no less than novelty and difference. Yet despite our sophisticated sense of the past in the present, the old in the new, when it comes to evaluating and judging the history we write, historians often make a fetish of the latest and greatest; we often place a premium on what is new. In this seminar (which like all my graduate courses shall be part reading course and part writing workshop), we shall explore both the idea of the new and the practice of “the new”: the new social history, the new political historical, the new historicism, the new narrative history, the new historical novel. We shall ask what, in contemporary historiography, is new under the sun.

26:510:520 Topics in the History of Technology
Professor Richard Sher
Wednesdays, 5:00-8:00 p.m.
This course will treat the relationships between technology and culture in a variety of historical and geographical settings. It will examine the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life and the way that technologies are adapted and exchanged by different societies. It will also study the biological/medical component in technological development; connections between technology and concepts of time and space; the role of the "great man"/inventor in technology and society; and the culture of "technological communities" - both historical and imaginary.

26:510:526 Problems and Readings in Afro-American History
Professor Clement A. Price
Tuesdays, 5:00-7:30 p.m.
“I have tracked my bleeding countrymen through the widely scattered documents of American history; I have listened to their groans, their clanking chains, and melting prayers, until the woes of a race and the agonies of centuries seem to crowd upon my soul as a bitter reality. Many pages of this history have been blistered with my tears; and, although having lived but a little more than a generation, my mind feels as if it were cycles old.” So wrote George Washington Williams in the preface of his 1884 tour de force, History of the Negro Race in America, 1619-1880. Williams, one of the founders of the Negro History Movement, could not have known at the time that the efforts of his and succeeding generations of historians in the field would ultimately change the larger story of the United States and that the consensus view of American life would ultimately become discredited by the 1960s. This course will examine contemporary issues in African American historical scholarship, including race, class, gender, sexuality, and popular culture from the late 19th century to the modern civil rights movement. It will explore as well the oppositional, or protest, sensibilities of modern black life, the significance of the Great Migration to northern and southern black communities and the influence of recent African American historical scholarship on the study of race and whiteness.

26:510:555 Selected Topics in American Urban and Ethnic History
Professor Beryl Satter
Mondays, 5:00-7:30 p.m.
This course draws on classic and recent studies to examine key themes in the history of the post-1945 American city. Topics covered include the rise of suburbia and the impact of this attempt to create "safe" and segregated living spaces on gender and sexuality; the history of urban renewal and public housing; the structure of "machine" politics; racial and ethnic battles over jobs, housing and urban space in the context of both prosperity and deindustrialization; the national political repercussions of these local urban battles; and the cultural politics of contemporary "gated communities" and "global" cities.

26:510:598 History of Technology, Environment, and Medicine: Theory and Method
Professor Stephen Pemberton
Thursdays, 5:00-8:00 p.m.
This course introduces students to the histories of technology, environment, and medicine, and examines the diverse strategies that historians in these fields are using today. We will examine what is distinctive about these fields of history, as well as what it means to engage in the historical study of technologies, the environment, health, medicine, and the sciences. How, for example, do historians of technology, environment, and medicine interpret society, culture, and politics? What assumptions and approaches do they share with the social historian, the cultural historian, the political historian, or the student of world history? Concepts like class, race, and gender are central to the practice of history today, and the histories of technology, environment, and medicine are no exception. The course will focus, in part, on how historians address issues of class, race, and gender in their writing about the histories of technology, environment, science, health, and medicine. We will also discuss how historians employ the theories and methods of other scholarly disciplines in their work, including the insights of anthropologists, biologists, philosophers, political activists, and sociologists. There will be a wide variety of readings that treat several continents. Most readings, however, address subjects in the 19th and 20th centuries.

26:510:549 Latin America and the United States
Professor Karen Caplan
Wednesdays, 5:00-7:30 p.m.
This course will explore the relationship between the United States and the nations of Latin America from the time of the independence of both until the present. This relationship has always been close, but also tense. This semester, we will explore both the closeness and the tension, looking both at the integration of the U.S. and Latin America and the conflict between the neighbors. Although we will discuss political and diplomatic issues, the course is not primarily about politics and diplomacy. Rather, it addresses the broad range of ways in which people from these two regions of the western hemisphere have come into contact with each other politically, economically, and culturally, touching on diverse topics and issues ranging from the Monroe Doctrine to racial constructions to the politics of Disney to economic integration and immigrant labor. Crucially, we will attempt at every step to view the relationship from both north and south, as Latin Americans experience the United States and vice versa.

26:510:571 Introduction to Historical Method: Nationalism: Theory and Practice
Professor Prachi Deshpande
Mondays, 5:00-7:30 p.m.
This course examines ideas of nationalism, nations and nation-states, the different ways in which nationalism is practiced and expressed, and the major theoretical works on these concepts. Nationalism is a global phenomenon: people have struggled everywhere for separate nationhood and much human and material loss has been attributed to nationalism. A core feature of nationalist thought is the deep antiquity of nations, yet much scholarship has emphasized that nations are a relative modern and fragile formation. Nationalist sentiments inspire very strong positive or negative sentiments, yet it has proved difficult to arrive at a consensus definition of nationalism. Is it a political ideology, an agent of modernization or a cultural artefact? How does nationalist sentiment relate to social class, religion, race and gender? These are some of the contradictions and issues that this course will address. We will read major theorists like Anderson, Chatterjee, Gellner and Hobsbawm, besides others. A major theme of the course will be to address the question of “non-western” and “anti-colonial” nationalisms in the nineteenth century, and we will consider the example of Indian nationalism in this regard. We will look at the conditions under which nationalism emerged in the Indian subcontinent, its political and cultural dimensions and its contribution to the eventual partition of India into the two nation-states of India and Pakistan.

Fall 2004

26: 510: 505 History in Fiction and Fact
Professor James Goodman
Mondays 5:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m., Conklin 324
In this class, which is part graduate seminar and part history writing workshop, we shall explore a few historical events and problems--and the character of historical understanding and historical writing themselves--by juxtaposing closely related works of history, biography, memoir, and fiction.

We shall start with six weeks of reading. Our attention will be divided: On the one hand we will read for content, thinking hard about the past--about what happened and the meaning and significance of what happened. On the other hand we will read for form, thinking about the relations between history and fiction; the similarities and differences between truth in history and truth in fiction; the ways in which historians and novelists use facts, sources, evidence, narrative, analysis, and imagination to arrive at historical understanding and truths; the literary dimensions of historical literature and the historical dimension of fiction.

We will practice criticizing history as literature and fiction as history. Then you will devote a month to the research for and writing of a history of your own. We will conclude the course with four weeks of intensive history writing workshops, in which each of you will present a late-draft of a short of history to the class for discussion. Thesis-writers-to-be interested in novels and other formal literary texts will get a sense of the variety of ways that historians can use (and the variety of ways that they can misuse) novels as primary sources for their historical narrative and historical interpretation. Thesis-writers interested in experimenting with the form of their thesis will get a sense of the approaches and techniques they might borrow from novelists and writers of imaginative non-fiction-- and also a sense of the boundaries they dare not cross.

26: 510: 532 Topics in US Diplomatic History: The United States and Empire
Professor Susan Carruthers
Thursdays 5:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Can a state be both anti-colonial in its self-image and imperial in its practices? Was US imperialism at the turn of the nineteenth century an aberrant moment in its history, or does imperialism, in various guises, typify America’s interactions with other peoples, cultures and regions? This course explores problematic questions surrounding the United States, its global relationships, and the character of US power.
America’s vexed relationship with empire has long animated historical enquiry, generating considerable debate and methodological diversity. Over the past 18 months it has become the subject of much heated contemporary controversy. The course examines a rich historiographical tradition as well as some of the more recent excurses on the United States and empire. Temporally, works selected for study cover the period from the unfolding of “Manifest Destiny”, through the 1890s—and the US acquisition of formal empire in the Caribbean and Pacific—to current concerns over globalization and the “war on terror”. The readings have been chosen to provide students with a sense of chronological progression from the nineteenth century to today. However, they also represent a wide array of scholarly approaches to the study of empire, from both humanities and social science traditions, including materialist and culturalist analyses; gender history; and literary criticism. Some adopt a top-down approach, focusing on elite policy and interactions, while other authors concentrate on imperialism as enacted or experienced on the ground. Our discussions will explore the relative merits of differing methodologies and epistemologies, and will consider how theories of imperialism, and America’s relationship to it, have changed over time.

26:510:537 Probs Ancient World: Ancient Democracies
Professor Gary Farney
Wednesdays 5:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
This course will explore the political systems and the political cultures of Athens' Democracy (511-323 BC) and Rome's Republic (509-27 BC) through a close examination of the original sources (in translation) and modern scholarship. Readings in the ancient sources will include significant excerpts of Aristotle, Plato, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plutarch, Aristophanes, Cicero and Sallust. Special attention will be devoted to how each form of government developed, how and why each disappeared (or evolved into something different), and who was included or left out of these "democracies". Finally, we shall also try to see how adequately modern definitions and ideas of political culture fit in the ancient model.

26:510:585 American History, 1945-Present
Professor Beryl Satter
Mondays 5:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
This course surveys histories of the U.S., 1945 to the present. Topics covered include cultural, domestic, and racial tensions of the 1940s and 1950s; anti-Communist networks of the 1950s; the Civil Rights, New Left, Women's Liberation and Gay Liberation movements; the Vietnam War; Puerto Rican labor migrations; and the rise of the New Right. The course concludes with readings on globalization that will allow students to situate America's recent political and economic transformations within a transnational context.

26:510:593 Culture and Science in the History of American Medicine
Professor Stephen Pemberton
Mondays 5:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
This reading seminar provides an overview of U.S. medical history in the 19th and 20th centuries, and a familiarity with the theoretical and practical approaches to the complex relationships between medicine, science and culture. Of particular focus will be the extent to which medicine is or has been scientific; the ways science became vital to the medical professions; and the degrees to which medicine’s professional culture both mirrors and informs American society and popular culture. Our readings will allow us to link interactions between medicine, science and culture to the changing political economy of health in the U.S. and analyze a variety of issues, including the growing role of technology in medicine, the roles of business and government in managing health, and the historical effects of specific disease problems ranging from tuberculosis and AIDS to diabetes and cancer. Students will also have the opportunity to explore how issues of class, race, gender and sexuality have impacted cultural interactions between medical professionals, scientists, and the public.

26:510:599 The Social History of Communication
Professor Richard B. Sher
Wednesdays 5:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
This course considers communication as a social and historical phenomenon, subject to enormous variation according to time and place, yet always central to human activity. Themes will include orality and literacy; the rise of printing; the information revolution of the Enlightenment; the emergence of electric and electronic communication technologies; and specialized uses of communication such as propaganda. Among the authors who will be discussed are Harold Innis, Walter Ong, Elizabeth Eisenstein, Roger Chartier, Robert Darnton, and Marshall McLuhan.

Spring 2004

26:510:504 READING AND WRITING NARRATIVE HISTORY
Mondays  5:00-7:30 PM
Professor James Goodman
Reading and Writing Narrative History is a is a hybrid, part graduate seminar, part graduate writing workshop. And unlike most graduate courses, where the focus is on a particular time, place, approach, group of people, method, or theme, our focus shall be on one particular form of historical writing, one of the oldest forms of historical writing, narrative history. What is it? How it is similar to and different from other forms of historical writing? How should we read it, talk about it, criticize it, review it, and teach it? Should graduate students with so much read it and so little time to read it, read it at all? Should professional historians write it?

We shall spend our first sox weeks reading, reading as writers read, for form as well as for content and, at our best, we for the relationship between the two, the relationship between what a particular writer wants to say and how he or she uses evidence, language, imagination, and the tools and tricks of the storytelling trade to say it. We shall read as shameless opportunists. What, we will ask at every turn, can we learn from each writer's successes and failures? What, when we sit down to write, can we imitate, borrow, or steal?

26:510:520 TOPICS/HIST OF TECH
Wednesdays  5:00-7:30 PM
Professor Richard Sher
This course will treat the relationships between technology and culture in a variety of historical and geographical settings. It will examine the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life and the way that technologies are adapted and exchanged by different societies. It will also study the biological/medical component in technological development; connections between technology and concepts of time and space; the role of the "great man"/inventor in technology and society; and the culture of "technological communities" - both historical and imaginary.

26:510:549 TOPICS MOD LATIN AM HISTORY: The Construction of Race in Latin America, 1492 to the Present
Wednesdays  5:00-7:30 PM
Professor Karen Caplan
Since 1492, Latin America has been the site of intense encounters between indigenous people, people of European descent, and people of African descent. One important result is that Latin Americans have developed complex ways of conceiving of distinctions among and between themselves. Beginning with the pre-history of European conquest and ending in the late twentieth century, this course asks how and why such distinctions developed, and what impact they have had on politics and culture in Latin America. Many historians have argued that Latin Americans, because of the high degree of intermixture between people of different backgrounds, have developed notions of difference based less on a concept of "race" than on one of "color." This course will examine this claim and ask what-if anything-is indeed unique about Latin American social distinctions. Moreover, as we approach the modern period, the course will focus on three related questions about Latin America and the United States. First, is it useful to compare Latin American racial constructions with those of the U.S., given their comparable history of racial encounter? Second, how have differences in these regions' notions of race affected the relationship between Latin Americans and a United States government that acted as an imperial force in the hemisphere? And finally, what has happened when Latin Americans, as part of a massive influx of immigrants, have brought their racial ideas and experiences to the U.S. with them?

26:510:562 THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT
Mondays 5:00-7:30 PM
Professor Neil Maher
This reading seminar provides an introduction to the new field of urban environmental history. In it we will explore the ever-changing interrelationship over time between American cities and urban and exurban nature. In this class we will examine the environmental history of urban America through three thematic lenses. First, we will analyze how society used nature in a variety of ways to construct cities across the American landscape. Second, we will focus on how these urban areas in turn transformed nature both within cities and beyond their borders, often in unintended and hazardous ways. And finally, we will turn to the various ways urbanites responded to the environmental threats associated with living in an American city. We will conclude by briefly examining the future of American cities through case studies of Los Angeles and New Jersey's urban hinterland.

26:510:590 PROBS & RDGS AFR HIST
Tuesdays 5:00-7:30 PM
Professor Said Samatar
This is the second of a two-part seminar on the phenomenon of Europe’s venture in Africa, generally known as colonialism. This part (Spring semester) aims to explore aspects of African responses to European intrusion into their lands and lives. Some African societies resisted to the death, perhaps unwittingly inspired by Patrick Henry’s famous dictum: “Give me Liberty or Give me Death”. Others collaborated with the new order of European administrations to their advantage. Still, others responded by fleeing the area of threat. Further, the two phases of resistance—sometimes referred to as “Primary and Secondary”—will be explored. In the first phase (roughly 1850-1920) traditional African leaders, often using African methods of organization and warfare, attempted to halt the European advance. It largely failed. In the second (1920-1960), nationalist movements with large-scale grass-roots following arose to eject Europe successfully. What enabled “Secondary Resisters” to triumph where “Primary Resisters” failed? The adoption of more sophisticated means of resistance by the Africans? Or new developments in Europe itself that conspired against empire-making and keeping? Combination of elements from both?

In dealing with the “Primary” phase, one or two wide-ranging discursive lectures will survey the following sample resistants: Samori’s resistance to the French in the Windward Coast of West Africa, the Asante vs. the British, the Zulu and Xhosa vs. Boer (Afrikaner) migrants, the Baganada vs. The British, the Nandi resistance, the Somali Dervish movement, the Mau Mau of Kenya, etc.

***History graduate students may take the following course for History credit:

26:478:572 EVOLUTION OF THE GLOBAL SYSTEM
Thursdays 5:00-7:40 PM
Professor Susan Carruthers
Since the end of the cold war, “globalization” has been a ubiquitous buzzword—endlessly repeated, yet poorly understood and susceptible to myriad interpretations. Is it shrinking and compressing time and space, creating a “borderless world”? Is it producing a homogenous “McWorld”, or widening economic disparities between the global haves and have-nots, and occasioning increasingly violent forms of resistance (of which terrorism may be one)? Or might it be simultaneously binding and fracturing communities far distant from one another?

This course takes as its starting point an understanding of “globalization” as more than simply a convenient label to denote the period since the cold war’s collapse. It therefore sets out to trace the historical trajectory of a variety of globalizing processes, and the evolution of various forms of “globalism”—as embodied in international regimes, organizations, and social and cultural movements. Topics covered will include the development of Empire; the expansion of global trade (in commodities and human beings); the emergence of the states-system; connections between war and globalization; and the current operations of the “neo-liberal” order (in both its economic and political forms, including the recent emergence of a human rights-inflected challenge to norms of state sovereignty).

In sum, the course seeks to consider:

    a variety of ways of conceiving and theorizing “the global”
    the changing character, and degree of globality, of this system (or these systems)
    forms of resistance to it/them

Fall 2003

26:510:506 POETICS OF HISTORY
Mondays 5-7:30 Conklin 324
Professor JAMES GOODMAN
Exploration of one or more of the literary forms that history has taken since Herodotus.  Those forms include (but are not limited to) epic, chronicle, drama, narrative, interpretive essays, monographs, statistical studies, and social scientific reports.   The course is part graduate seminar and part history writing workshop. In this fall's seminar we shall read and write about the history of war.

26:510:529 TOPICS IN EUROPEAN INTELLECTUAL &CULTURAL HISTORY, 1650-1850: ENLIGHTENMENT, CULTURE, AND NATIONAL INDENTITY IN 18TH-CENTURY BRITAIN
Wednesdays 5-8 p.m.  Cullimore 407
PROFESSOR RICHARD SHER

Preliminary Syllabus

Introduction: This course will examine three related topics in British intellectual and cultural history during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries: polite culture and manners, national identity and empire, and the Enlightenment and the idea of history.  The focus throughout will be on the nature of civil society as it was experienced culturally and depicted intellectually.

The first part of the course, on polite culture and manners, will begin in week 2 with a book by James Van Horn Melton on the public in eighteenth-century England and Europe.  This work deals with a number of important subjects from the standpoint of Jürgen Habermas’s theory of the public sphere, including print culture, theater, the place of women in intellectual culture, taverns and coffeehouses, and freemasonry. Because the approach is comparative, with particular attention to England, France, and Germany, this book will provide a European framework for the rest of the course.  The third and fourth weeks will be devoted to John Brewer’s immensely entertaining work on English culture, covering the nature of English elite society, print culture, and painting in week 3, and the performing arts, antiquarianism, and provincial culture in week 4. Part I will conclude with a book by Philip Carter on male polite culture, a topic that cannot be discussed without attention to related themes such as sensibility and relations between men and women.

The second part of the course, on national identity and empire, will first consider, in weeks 6 and 7, Gerald Newman’s study of the rise of English nationalism and Linda Colley’s acclaimed Britons.  Colley looks at the making of Britain from the perspective of internal integration and identity defined in opposition to external “others” – in other words, as a function of empire.  However, not every group within Britain participated equally in the process of integration.  In week 8 we will confront this issue by reading Frank Felsenstein’s study of anti-semetic stereotypes in English culture.  Part II will conclude in week 9 with Kathleen Wilson’s attempt to analyze the interplay of English national identity, empire, and gender.

The third part of the course will focus on the Enlightenment, especially in Scotland, and particularly the way that history was conceptualized by Enlightenment thinkers.  Alexander Broadie’s concise and comprehensive overview of the Scottish Enlightenment will be read in week 10.  Then we will read some contemporary texts, including Adam Ferguson’s Essay on the History of Civil Society in week 11 and writings by William Robertson and John Millar in week 12.  After the Thanksgiving break, the course will conclude with two studies of British (largely Scottish) historical writing and its significance: the first by Mark Salber Phillips in week 12 and the second by J.G.A. Pocock in week 13.

26:510:565 PUBLIC HISTORY
Tuesdays 5-7:30 Conklin 324
Professor CLEMENT A. PRICE
This course is inspired by recent conflicts over the presentation of American history in public venues, including the Smithsonian Institution, the Library of Congress, Colonial Williamsburg, and the Liberty Bell Pavilion. The course explores on going debates on the construction of the past in documentary and dramatic film and the public perception that American history has lost its resonance as a positive narrative on democracy.  The course also reflects professor’s interest in encouraging graduate students in history to consider the public realm for professional historical work. Toward those objectives, the course will focus on recent controversies surrounding what might be called “history in the public square,” which is marked by intense debates on revisionist history, public sensibilities about the past, and the role of historians in and out of the academy.   Among the topics we will consider will be the state of American history during the “Culture Wars”; exhibiting the “new history” in an age of conservative liberalism; historical film as methodology and genre; “nearby history” as revealed in the New Jersey public history movement, and conflicts over the teaching of history in the United States.  Students will be become familiar with theoretical and practical approaches to the presentation of history for the general public.  Course requirements include assigned weekly readings, book reviews, and film and exhibition critiques.  Students will also form exploratory teams that will examine and critique current or recently completed projects in public history.

26:510:585    PROBLEMS AND REDINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY 1945-PRESENT: A SURBURBAN NATION – THE POLITICS AND CULTURE OF METROPOLITAN GROWTH IN THE MODERN U.S.
Thursdays 5 – 7:30 Conklin 324
PROFESSOR DAVID M. P.FREUND
Over the course of the 20th century, the United States was transformed from a country largely dominated by its cities to one largely dominated by its suburbs.  People, housing, jobs, capital, and even leisure have been migrating to the suburbs in a stream that began in earnest in the 1940s, and that has not let up since.

Why did this happen, and what have its implications been for American society, culture, and politics?  This course will introduce participants to the “suburban revolution” that was sparked and sustained, beginning during the New Deal, by the federal government’s intensive involvement in metropolitan growth.  We will examine the range of public and private sector actions that have encouraged suburban “sprawl”; the suburban politics and practices that have contributed to the re-segregation of metropolitan regions by race and by class; the ways in which post-war suburbanization—both its image and its reality—have shaped political debates over domestic and even foreign policy; the lasting economic impacts of sprawl, especially on central cities; and finally the popular texts and commentary about America’s suburban revolution, ranging from 1950s T.V. sitcoms, to sociologists’ laments about the “Organization Man,” to Wayne’s World.

26:510:598 HISTORY TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENT &MEDICINE
Wednesdays 5-8, Conklin 324
PROFESSOR NEIL MAHER
The goals of this course are threefold.  We will begin the semester with a four week introduction to the three fields under consideration — the history of technology, environmental history, and the history of health — and then dedicate the rest of the semester to reading innovative works that attempt to bridge these three areas of study. Second, we will examine how these three fields together draw on and influence historical categories such as race, class, and gender, as well as a variety of sub-disciplines including social, political, and cultural history.  And finally, the class will explore several methodological and theoretical approaches to better understand how they inform this interrelationship among the history of technology, environment and health.

History Graduate Students may also take the following course for History credit:

26:478:572 Evolution of the Global System (Global Affairs Core Course)
Thursdays 5 PM, Room 394, 3rd Floor, Law School Building
Professor Richard Langhorne

Professor Langhorne’s room is in the Center for Global Change and Governance, Suite 510, 5th floor Law School Building, phone 5585, e-mail langhorn@andromeda.rutgers.edu

PART I: with Professor Langhorne,

1. Thursday 4 September:    Introduction - organization of course, general themes, procedures for submitting papers etc.
2. Thursday 11 September:  The Old World and the Emergence of the States= System: pre 1800
3. Thursday 18 September:  The States= System in Action I: 1800 - 1890
4. Thursday 25 September:   The States= System in Action II: 1890 - 1949
5. Thursday  2 October:        Ditto
6. Thursday  9 October:       The Global Bi-Polar System: 1949 - 1989
7: Thursday 16 October:       Ditto
9: Thursday 23 October:       The End of the States System since 1989
10: Thursday 30 October:    Consequences of the Globalization of World Politics      
11: Thursday 6  November:  Ditto

PART II: with Ka Neng Au (at Dana Library)
12: Thursday 13 November: Techniques of Global Communication
13: Thursday 20 November: Techniques of Global Communication
14: Thursday 27 November: THANKSGIVING
15: Thursday 4 December:  Case Study Work

The aim of this course is to link knowledge gained about the evolution of the contemporary global political and economic system, and how it has been studied across disciplines, with  its contemporary functioning via the global telecommunications system.  Students will first be required to write one paper, to be delivered by 14 November, on a topic relevant to the first part of the course. Using both these sources of knowledge, each student will then produce a case study of a current global issue, the precise topic to be agreed with Professor Langhorne and Dr. Au.  These studies must be delivered by 15 December. Students from the Department of History may devote their case study to an historical topic.  Grades will be given on performance in both pieces of writing.

Bibliography:

Note: Students may find it helpful to read the following books early on.

Watson, Adam The Evolution of International Society
Calvocoressi, Peter World Politics since 1945
Langhorne, Richard The Coming of Globalization
Polities: Authority, Identities and Change, Yale H. Ferguson and Richard W. Mansbach (1996)
The States System of Europe, 1640 - 1990, Andreas Osiander (1994)
Power and the Pursuit of Peace, F. H. Hinsley, (1963)
Systems of States, Martin Wight, (1977)
The Evolution of International Society, Adam Watson, (1992)
The Expansion of International Society, Hedley Bull and Adam Watson, (1984)
The Great Powers and the European States System, 1815 - 1914, F.R.Bridge and R.Bullen (1984)
The Origins of the First World War, James Joll,(1992)
The Origins of the Second World War in Europe, Philip Bell, (1986)
The Origins of the Second World War in Asia and the Pacific, Akira Iriye (1987)
Rise to Globalism, Steven Ambrose (1997)
Strategies of Containment, John Lewis Gaddis (1982)
World Politics since 1945, Peter Calvocoressi (1997)
Globalisation and Fragmentation, Ian Clark (1997)
The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, Paul Kennedy, (1987)
Globalisation of Firms and Competitiveness of Nations, John Dunning, (1990)
Democracy and the Global Order, David Held, (1995)
Globalisation and the Nation State, R. J. Holton (1998)
Globalization and its Discontents, Saskia Sassen (1998)
The Coming of Globalization, Richard Langhorne, (2001)

For further reading on globalization, students may find the bibliography at the back of my The Coming of Globalization useful.

 Back to Top